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VOL. I.]

THE HOBART TOWN

MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

MARCH, 1833.

[No. 1.

- Non tenues ignavo pollice chordas

Pulso, sed Arunci residens in margine templi,

Audax magnorum tumulis adcanto magistrum."-STATII SYLVIUS.

ADDRESS.

In presenting to the Public of this Colony a Miscellany, exclusively devoted to Literature and Science, the conductors are induced to offer a few remarks in explanation of their views and intentions. The novelty of their plan is, of itself, perhaps sufficient to attract attention in the first instance; but, erroneous indeed will be the opinion of their Readers, if they imagine that this alone will constitute their principal claim to public patronage. Their aim is much higher their ambition much more lofty and meritorious,-they aspire to establish such a Miscellany, as shall not only prove highly acceptable to their fellow Colonists, but, at the same time, show their friends and well-wishers in "Old England," that Tasmania is not devoid of individuals who have the means, as well as the desire, of cultivating Literature as well as Land, and of devoting their best and liveliest energies to its interests and advancement.

The want of such a work, as that which is now contemplated, has long been experienced in the Colony. The highly intelligent character of the general Settler, and his anxiety to find some meang

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of relaxation and entertainment, beyond the mere gratification of his physical propensities, will induce him to hail the appearance of our Magazine with delight and satisfaction; and it shall be our own fault, if we do not strengthen and foster this gracious and salutary feeling, by our earnest endeavors to please, and, perchance, instruct him. But the general Settler is not the only inhabitant of this territory; neither is he the only individual, whose good opinion we desire, or whose oblectation we shall study to promote. Our exertions will be directed towards all classes, from the very highest personage in the Colony to the lowliest-"who desireth instruction, and whose soul thirsteth after knowledge." To those who, happily, enjoy offices of high trust and acceptable emolument, we offer a cheering, harmless, and we scruple not to say it-an intellectual relaxation from the arduous toils of official duty. We will undertake to promise, that the pages of this Miscellany shall never be stained by political or general personalities—that scurrility shall never find even a dark corner to sculk in-and that the advancement of intelligence and wisdom, by means rigidly compatible with Morality, Honor, and Truth, shall alone find support and advocacy in the columns of our Magazine. We do not say, that we shall never be satirical. "Wit and humour," says Addisona paramount authority in these matters-"that expose vice and folly, furnish useful diversions. Raillery (in other words satire) under such regulations, unbends the mind from severer contemplations, without throwing it off from its proper bias," and, therefore, although we are→

"Too discreet,

To run a-muck, and tilt at all we meet;"—

still we shall, occasionally, indulge in that salutary vein of Satire, which shall have for its object, the exposure of error, and the inculcation of virtue; we may be, now and then, severe on the vices of a whole class—but we shall never needlessly wound the feelings of an individual.

And then, the Ladies! How shall we propitiate them? The

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