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The occasion of the several Exercises was before ex

plained by notices attached to them: it has been thought

sufficient to substitute for these a general Table of Reference.

An Index of Authors is added to that of first lines.

In acknowledgement of the favourable reception which

this. Collection has met with at the sister University, the

Compiler has allotted a place in it to several pieces proposed in the Ireland and other Oxford Scholarship Examinations,

most of which were furnished by his friend, the Rev. GEORGE

BUTLER M.A. late Fellow of Exeter College, (now Principal

of Liverpool College).

CHELTENHAM COLLEGE

Jan. 23, 1857

In the Third Edition upwards of three hundred and fifty

new passages have been interspersed among those contained

in the Second.

A few illustrative Notes and a complete Index of Subjects have been added; while to each Extract a descriptive

Heading has been prefixed.

SCHOOL HOUSE, IPSWICH

July 16, 1862

THE Fourth Edition, which has been carefully revised,

contains more than one hundred new passages incorporated

with the old; a few pieces which appeared in former editions

have been omitted. To obviate the inconvenience arising

from the difference in this arrangement of the entire Mis

cellany caused by the introduction of new pieces and the omission of old, a comparative Table of the Sections in this

and the third Edition has been drawn up, which will be

found at the end of the Volume.

The Editor desires to thank MESSRS MOXON for permit

ting him to introduce several passages selected from books of which they possess the Copy-right.

IPSWICH

Aug. 4, 1866

PASSAGES FOR TRANSLATION

INTO LATIN ELEGIAC VERSE

I

TH

HAPPY INSENSIBILITY
CHE lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day,

had he thy reason, would he skip and play?
pleased to the last, he crops the flowery food
and licks the hand just raised to shed his blood.

A. POPE

2

WHO

CHARMS AND KNOTS

I
HO read a chapter when they rise
shall ne'er be troubled with ill eyes.

II
A poor man's rod, when thou dost ride,
is both a weapon and a guide.

III

Who shuts his hand hath lost his gold,
who opens it hath it twice told.

IV

Who goes to bed and does not pray
maketh two nights to every day.

V

Who by aspersions throw a stone
at the head of others, hit their own.

VI

Who looks on ground with humble eyes,
finds himself there and seeks to rise.

VII

When the hair is sweet through pride or lust,
the powder doth forget the dust.

VIII
In shallow waters heaven doth show:
but who drinks on to hell may go.

G. HERBERT

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FR

IN
N the lines you have sent are the Muses and Graces,
you've the Nine in your wit and the Three in your
faces.

II
RIEND, for your epitaphs I'm grieved,

where still so much is said ;
one half will never be believed,
the other never read.

III O bright is thy beauty, so charming thy song as had drawn both the beasts and their Orpheus

along; but such is thy avarice and such is thy pride, that the beasts must have starved and the poet died.

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A. POPE

4

5

TO A FRIEND ON HIS BIRTHDAY
ON

N parent knees a naked newborn child

weeping thou sat’st, while all around thee smiled;
so live, that, sinking to thy life's last sleep,
calm thou may’st smile, whilst all around thee weep.

SIR W. JONES
EPITAPH ON AN INFANT
E RE

death came with friendly care,
to heaven the opening bud conveyed
and bade it blossom there.

S. T. COLERIDGE
THE ENVIOUS SNOWS
'HE envious snows came down in haste
to prove

her breast less fair-
but when they found themselves surpassed
dissolved into a tear.

EPIGRAM
"HE adorning thee with so much art

is but a barbarous skill;
'tis like the poisoning of the dart,
too apt before to kill.

A. COWLEY

6

THE prove her breast Tess fair"

7

THI

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