Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub
[blocks in formation]

THOUGH death's strong

image in thy

form we trace, come sleep! and fold me in thy soft embrace; come genial sleep! that sweetest blessing give to die thus living and thus dead to live.

9

LOVE

10

each has a flower and each has a thorn;
roses die when the cold wind blows,
love, it is killed by lady's scorn!

LORD STRANGFORD
EPITAPH ON SIR ISAAC NEWTON
ATURE and nature's laws lay hid in night ;
God said “Let Newton be;' and all was light,

A. POPE
THE VICISSITUDES OF HUMAN LIFE
ΠΑΙΓΝΙΟΝ εστι τύχης μερόπων βίος, οικτρός, αλήτης,

πλούτου και πενίης μεσσόθι ρεμβόμενος,
και τους μεν κατάγουσι πάλιν σφαιρηδον αείρει,

τους δ' από των νεφελών εις Αίδην κατάγει.

NA

II

PALLADAS

12

THE

13

ME

THE SORROWS OF CHILDHOOD
'HE tear down childhood's cheek that flows

is like the dewdrop on the rose;
when next the summer breeze comes by
and waves the bush, the flower is dry,

SIR W. SCOTT
FILIAL PIETY
E let the tender office long engage

to rock the cradle of reposing age,
with lenient att extend a mother's breath,
make languor smile and smoothe the bed of death,
explore the thought, explain the asking eye,
and save awhile one parent from the sky.

A. POPE
APOLOGY FOR VAGRANTS
OLD on Canadian hills or Minden's plain

perhaps that parent mourned her soldier slain;
bent o'er her babe, her eyes dissolved in dew,
the big drops mingling with the milk he drew
gave the sad presage of his future years-
the child of misery baptized in tears.

J. LANGHORNE

14

C peph

15

EPITAPH ON JAMES CRAGGS IN

WESTMINSTER ABBEY

STA

TATESMAN, yet friend to truth, of soul sincere;

in action faithful and in honour clear: who broke no promise, served no private end; who gained no title and who lost no friend; ennobled by himself, by all approved; praised wept and honoured by the Muse he loved.

A. POPE

16

EPITAPH ON THE COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE

SISTER TO SIR PHILIP SIDNEY

lies the subject of all verse, Sidney's sister, Pembroke's mother: Death, ere thou hast slain another learned and fair and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee.

B. JONSON

17

LOVE OUTLIVES TIME

DEY
EVOURING Time with stealing pace

makes lofty oaks and cedars bow;
and marble towers and gates of brass

in his rude march he levels low: but Time destroying far and wide Love from the soul can ne'er divide.

B. BOOTH

18

SPIRIT OF PLATO

E

`AGLE, why soarest thou above that tomb?

floatest thou?
I am the image of swift Plato's spirit
ascending heaven: Athens does inherit
his corpse below.

P. B. SHELLEY

19

[ocr errors]

WOMAN'S LOVE
WOMAN in our hours of ease

uncertain coy and hard to please
and variable as the shade
by the light quivering aspen made,
when pain and anguish wring the brow,
a ministering angel thou.

SIR W. SCOTT

[blocks in formation]

WHE

THEN Neptune towering o'er her Adrian wave

saw Venice rise and Ocean's rage enslave,
'Boast as thou wilt of Rome' to Jove he cried
'her rock Tarpeian and thy Mars her guide,'
yet own, though Tiber lure thee from the seas,
that mortals reared those walls, immortals these.

E. A. SMEDLEY

21

DUM VIVIMUS VIVAMUS

6

'Lday;

IVE while you live' the Epicure would say

6

22

THRE

'Live while you live the sacred preacher cries

and give to God each moment as it flies.'
Lord, in my view let both united be!-
I live in pleasure when I live to Thee !

J. DODDRIDGE
EPIGRAM ON MILTON
'HREE poets, in three distant ages born,

Greece Italy and England did adorn:
the first in loftiness of thought surpassed,
the next in majesty, in both the last :
the force of nature could no further go;
to make a third she joined the other two.

J. DRYDEN
THE MOTHER'S STRATAGEM
HILE on the cliff with calm delight she kneels,

and the blue vales a thousand joys recall,
see to the last, last verge her infant steals!

O fy!-yet stir not, speak not, lest it fall.
Far better thought,-she lays her bosom bare,
and the fond boy, springs back to nestle there.

S. ROGERS

23

WHILE

24

ON THOMAS MOORE'S DAUGHTER

S

WEET child, when on thy beauteous face

the blush of innocence I view, thy gentle mother's features trace,

thy father's look of genius too; if envy wake a moment's sigh,

thy face is my apology.

25

INSCRIPTION ON AN AEOLIAN HARP

,

that charm'st the ear with music all thine own, which though untouched canst rapturous strains impart, O rich of genuine nature, free from art ! Such the wild warblings of the sylvan throng, so simply sweet the untaught virgin's song.

C. SMART

[blocks in formation]

A ;

PEARLY dew-drop see some flower adorn

but soon the sun permits a fiercer ray,
and the fair fabric rushes to decay :
lo, in the dust the beauteous ruin lies;
and the pure vapour, seeks its native skies.
a fate like this to thee, sweet boy, was given :
to sparkle, bloom and be exhaled to heaven.

LORD BYRON

27

LOVE

[ocr errors]

OVE "he comes, and Love he tarries,

just as fate or fancy carries;
longest stays, when sorest chidden;
laughs and Aies, when pressed and bidden.
Love's a fire that needs renewal
of fresh beauty for its fuel:
love's wing moults when caged and captured;
only free, he soars enraptured.

T. CAMPBELL

28

TO HIS DEPARTED FRIEND HERACLITUS ΕΙΠΕ τις Ηράκλειτε τεον μόρον, ες δε με δάκρυ

ήγαγεν, εμνήσθην δ' δσσάκις αμφότεροι ήέλιον λέσχη κατεδύσαμεν άλλα συ μέν που

ξείν Αλικαρνασσεύ τέφρα πάλαι σποδίη: αι δε τεαι ζώουσιν αηδόνες, ήσιν ο πάντων αρπακτηρ 'Aΐδης ουκ έπι χείρα βαλει.

CALLIMACHVS

[blocks in formation]

ΑΥΤΑΙ σοι στομάτεσσιν ανηρείψαντο μέλισσαι

ποικίλα Μουσάων ανθεα δρεψάμεναι:
αυται και χάριτές σου εδωρήσαντο Μένανδρε

στώμυλον ευτυχίην, δράμασιν ενθέμεναι.
ζώεις εις αιώνα: το δε κλέος εστίν Αθήναις

έκ σέθεν ουρανίων απτόμενον νεφέων.

ANON.

30

TO A BEE SETTLING ON A LADY'S CHEEK

'ΑΝΘΟΔΙΑΙΤΕ μέλισσα, τί μοι χρoος Ηλιοδώρας

ψαύεις εκπρολιπούσειαρινας κάλυκας;
ή σύ γε μηνύεις ότι και γλυκύ και δυσύποιστον

πικρον αεί κραδία κέντρον "Έρωτος έχει και
ναι δοκέω, τούτ' είπας: ίω φιλέραστε παλίμπους

στείχε πάλαι την σην οίδαμεν αγγελίην.

MELEAGER

31

STEDFASTNESS

MHTE βαθυκτεάνoιo τύχης κουφίζεο ροίζω

μήτε σέο γνάμψη φροντίς ελευθερίην πας γαρ υπ' ασταθέεσσι βίος πελεμίζεται αύραις

τη και τη θαμινώς αντιμεθελκόμενος. η δ' άρετη σταθερόν τι και άτρoπoν, ής επί μoύνης κύματα θαρσαλέως ποντοπόρει βιότου.

PAVLVS SILENTIARIVS

« ForrigeFortsæt »