Paul's True Rhetoric: Ambiguity, Cunning, and Deception in Greece and Rome

Forsideomslag
A&C Black, 1. jan. 2001 - 219 sider
Scholars have long suspected that Paul s rhetorical strategies are not always irreproachable when judged by philosophical rhetorical standards. In Paul s True Rhetoric, Mark Given argues that Paul s rhetorical strategies in Acts and his letters display intentional ambiguity, cunning, and deception, and make him vulnerable to the charge that he perpetrates sophistries. Paul s deliberate use of misleading rhetoric was justified by his sincere conviction that he knew the truth and had a divine mandate to promote it in an apocalyptic world filled with deception. Like Socrates, Paul regarded his enemies and potential converts as being in a state of ignorance borne of deception. Since the deception was so severe, most had no idea how ignorant of the Truth they really were. Paul felt, as did Socrates, that he had to fool the deceived by becoming like them, pretending to be ignorant. Then, using an insinuative dialectic, he could gradually expose their ignorance both to themselves and others. Mark Given is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Southwest Missouri State University.
 

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Indhold

A Philosophic Paul
8
Like Socrates Paul
15
Ambiguity
24
A Truly Socratic Paul
35
Prologue
41
Dialogue
60
Stasimon
67
Exodus
75
1446
118
Apocalyptic Logocentrism
126
Collusion
136
Is I I in Romans 7?
147
15?
159
V
175
Bibliography
183
Index of Ancient Sources and Scripture
205

Cunning in Corinth
83
Containing Cunning in 1 Cor 14
90
1923
103

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Om forfatteren (2001)

Mark Given is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Southwest Missouri State University.

Bibliografiske oplysninger