Scenery & Antiquities of North-west Donegal

Forsideomslag
D. Irvine, 1893 - 120 sider
 

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Side 3 - A lofty pillar, •, rising from a bastion which bore during many weeks the heaviest fire of the enemy, is seen far up and far down the Foyle. On the summit is the statue of Walker, such as when, in the last and most terrible emergency, his eloquence roused the fainting courage of his brethren. In one hand he grasps a Bible. The other, pointing down the river, seems to direct the eyes of his famished audience to the English topmasts in the distant bay.
Side 4 - The Cathedral is filled with relics and trophies. In the vestibule is a huge shell, one of the many hundreds of shells which were thrown into the city. Over the altar are still seen the French flagstaves taken by the garrison in a desperate sally. The white ensigns of the House of Bourbon have long been dust, but their place has been supplied by new banners, the work of the fairest hands of Ulster. The anniversary of the day on which the gates were closed, and the anniversary of the day on which...
Side 4 - House of Bourbon have long been dust : but their place has been supplied by new banners, the work of the fairest hands of Ulster. The anniversary of the day on which the gates were closed, and the anniversary of the day on which the siege was raised, have been down to our own time celebrated by salutes, processions, banquets, and sermons...
Side 95 - Dear children, this is what I command with my last words — let peace and charity, a charity mutual and sincere, reign always among you ! If you act thus, following the example of the saints, God who strengthens the just will help you, and I, who shall be near Him, will intercede on your behalf, and you shall obtain of Him not only all the necessities of the present life...
Side 4 - In one hand he grasps a Bible. The other, pointing down the river, seems to direct the eyes of his famished audience to the English topmasts in the distant bay. Such a monument was well deserved : yet it was scarcely needed : for in truth the whole city is to this day a monument of the great deliverance. The wall is carefully preserved ; nor would any plea of health or convenience be held by the inhabitants sufficient to justify the demolition of that sacred enclosure which, in the evil time, gave...
Side 64 - I've wander'd o'er, Clombe many a crag, cross'd many a moor, But, by my halidome, A scene so rude, so wild as this, Yet so sublime in barrenness, Ne'er did my wandering footsteps press, • Where'er I happ'd to roam."— XIV.
Side 95 - After this he went down to the monastery, entered his cell, and began to work for the last time. He was then occupied in transcribing the Psalter. When he had come to the 33d Psalm and the verse, Inquirentes autem Dominum non deficient omni bono, he stopped short. " I must stop here," he said ;
Side 92 - The salt sea where the sea-gulls cry, When I come to Derry from far, It is sweeter and dearer to me — Sweeter to me.
Side 4 - The summit of the ramparts forms a pleasant walk. The bastions have been turned into little gardens. Here and there, among the shrubs and flowers, may be seen the old culverins which scattered bricks, cased with lead, among the Irish ranks. One antique gun, the gift of the Fishmongers of London, was distinguished, during the hundred and five memorable days, by the loudness of its report, and still bears the name of Roaring Meg.

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