Morals and Dogma of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry

Forsideomslag
L. H. Jenkins, 1871 - 861 sider
 

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The work of a Luciferian. Pike believes Lucifer to be the creator and it's very clear in this book. Læs hele anmeldelsen

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Side 223 - Our little systems have their day; They have their day and cease to be; They are but broken lights of thee, And thou, O Lord, art more than they.
Side 108 - But the images of men's wits and knowledges remain in books, exempted from the wrong of time and capable of perpetual renovation. Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages. So that if the invention of the ship...
Side 266 - And he said unto them, Unto you it is given to know the mystery of the kingdom of God: but unto them that are without, all these things are done in parables: That seeing they may see, and not perceive; and hearing they may hear, and not understand; lest at any time they should be converted, and their sins should be forgiven them.
Side 13 - Thy sun shall no more go down; Neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: For the LORD shall be thine everlasting light, And the days of thy mourning shall be ended. Thy people also shall be all righteous: They shall inherit the land for ever, The branch of my planting, the work of my hands, That I may be glorified.
Side 36 - For if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his natural face in a glass : for he beholdeth himself, and goeth his way, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was.
Side 111 - Be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine heart be hasty to utter any thing before God: for God is in heaven, and thou upon earth : therefore let thy words be few.
Side 108 - We see then how far the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power, or of the hands. For have not the verses of Homer continued twentyfive hundred years, or more, without the loss of a syllable or letter; during which time, infinite palaces, temples, castles, cities, have been decayed and demolished...
Side 286 - Sea, going before them by day in a pillar of cloud, and by night, in a pillar of fire.
Side 109 - In the morning sow thy seed, and in the evening withhold not thy hand: for thou knowest not whether shall prosper, either this or that, or whether they both shall be alike good.
Side 107 - ... to this tendeth the desire of memory, fame, and celebration ; and in effect, the strength of all other human desires. We see then how far the monuments of wit and learning are more durable than the monuments of power or of the hands. For have not the verses...

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