The Two Books of Francis, Lord Verulam: Of the Proficience and Advancement of Learning, Divine and Human ...

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W. Pickering, 1825 - 402 sider

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Side 313 - I seen also under the sun, and it seemed great unto me: there was a little city, and few men within it; and there came a great king against it, and besieged it, and built great bulwarks against it: now there was found in it a poor wise man, and he by his wisdom delivered the city; yet no man remembered that same poor man.
Side 158 - I am come in my Father's name, and ye receive me not: if another shall come in his own name, him ye will receive.
Side 13 - Jupiter's chair. ^<fo conclude therefore : let no man, upon a weak conceit of sobriety, or an ill-applied moderation, think or maintain, that a man can search too far, or be too well studied in the book of God's word, or in the book of God's works ; divinity or philosophy ; but rather let men endeavour an endless progress, or proficience in both...
Side 57 - So it is in contemplation; if a man will begin with certainties, he shall end in doubts; but if he will be content to begin with doubts, he shall end in certainties.
Side 309 - He that observeth the wind shall not sow; and he that regardeth the clouds shall not reap.
Side 364 - Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me : and again a little while and ye shall see me ; and, Because I go to the Father ? They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while ? we cannot tell what he saith.
Side 267 - But men must know, that in this theatre of man's life, it is reserved only for God and angels to be lookers on...
Side 226 - For the mind of man is far from the nature of a clear and equal glass, wherein the beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced.
Side 52 - ... for, as water will not ascend higher than the level of the first spring-head from whence it descendeth, so knowledge derived from Aristotle, and exempted from liberty of examination, will not rise again higher than the knowledge of Aristotle.
Side 142 - Because true history propoundeth the successes and issues of actions not so agreeable to the merits of virtue and vice. therefore poesy feigns them more just in retribution, and more according to revealed providence.

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