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PRE FACE.

The rise and progress of English poetry form one of the most delightful and instructive chapters in the intellectual history of the world. We trace its glimmering dawn in the ballads of the early minstrels, its brilliant morning in the Canterbury Tales, and its rich and bold development in the literature of the age of Elizabeth, in which British genius reached an elevation unparalleled in the history of mankind. Bacon and Hobbes and Coke, Barrow and Taylor and HOOKER, RALEIGH and SELDEN and SIDNEY, SPENSER and SHAKSPEARE and Milton, breathed in the same generation the air of England, and though they did not all give a lyrical expression to thought and passion, they were nearly all poets, in the truest and highest sense of the word, and they formed with their contemporaries the most wonderful constellation of great men that ever adorned a nation or an age.

It is a remark of Hume, that when arts come to perfection in a state they necessarily decline, and seldom or never revive there. In England the decline of poetry, which had reached its highest elevation in SIAKSPEARE and Milton, was as rapid as had been its rise, and in the long interregnum which succeeded the Restoration, scarcely a work was produced which has an actual and enduring popularity. The artificial school introduced from the Continent by the followers of CHARLES the Second, attained its acme at last, however, in the polished numbers of Pope, and a gradual return to nature became visible in the productions of Thomson and Cowper and BURNS, who ushered in the second great era of British literature, a general view of the poetical portion of which I have endeavoured to present in this volume.

There is at the present time, it seems to me, great need of a work of this sort. The surveys and selections of English poetry from CHAUCER to the close of the last century, are numerous, and some of them, especially those of CAMPBELL and Hazlitt, are made with singular candour and discernment. But there has hitherto been no extensive review of the poetry of the Nineteenth Century, more rich and varied than that of all other periods, excepting only the golden one of SHAKSPEARE.

From those whose entire works have been republished in this country, and of whom a knowledge may safely be presumed, I have deemed it in some instances

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unnecessary to quote very largely, while I have presented comparatively numerous selections from several poets who are less familiar to American readers. It is a singular fact that while, with the exception of TALFOURD, KNOWLES and BULWER, so few have recently added to the stock of standard acting plays, so many fine poems have appeared in the dramatic form. From some of these I have drawn with considerable freedom, though less largely than I should have done but for the difficulty of doing justice to authors in mere extracts from works of this description. One of the most striking distinctions of the poetry of this century is undoubtedly discoverable in the great number of deservedly popular lyrics which it embraces. In no other period have so many exquisite gems of feeling, thought and language been produced. To the best of my judgment I have brought together the most admirable of these, with the finest passages of longer poems which could not themselves be given entire.

The merits of Byron and WORDSWORTH have been amply discussed by recent critics on both sides of the Atlantic, and the claims of SHELLEY begin to attract a share of the attention they deserve. If the author of Childe Harold excelled all others in the poetry of intense emotion, and the bard of Rydal in that of reflective sentiment, Shelley has contributed no less to what is purely imaginative in the divine art. The graphic power of CRABBE in dealing with actual and homely materials, the picturesque and romantic beauty of Scott, the wildness, sublimity and feeling of COLERIDGE, the gorgeous description and fine reflection of Souther, the voluptuous imagery and happy wit of Moore, the elegance and rhetorical energy of CAMPBELL, have each in their degree influenced the popular taste; while the classical imagery of Keats, the brilliance and tenderness of Proctor, the cheerfulness and humanity of Hunt, and the philosophic repose of Milnes, interest the warın sympathies of different readers.

A taste for poetry is visibly increasing among us, especially for that poetry which celebrates the triumphs of humanity, the sacred claims of freedom, the holy associations of love, and all the scenes and sentiments which redeem life and make hallowed ground of the earth. There is much in the following pages fitted to promote and refine such a taste, and that they may essentially contribute to so desirable a result is the earnest hope of the editor.

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Fhiladelphia, October 20, 1814.

CONTENTS.

WILLIAM WORDS WORTH.

Clouds after a Storm

51

Man never to be Scorned

52

Obedience and Humility

62

A Deserted Wife

Chatterton

62

Picture of a Beggar

52

A Lover.

52

Longing for Reunion with the Dead

62

A Child with a Shell

53

Apostrophe to the Deity

63

Communion with Nature.

63

From a Poem on the Power of Sound.

53

Dion ....

54

Character of the Happy Warrior

55

The Power of Virtue.

55

Intimations of Immortality, from Recollections of Early Childhood 56

Evening by the Thames

67

Scorn not the Sonnet

68

Great Men.

58

Mi ton

58

Toussaint L'Ouverture.

58

“ The World is too much with us"

68

A Nation's Power pot in Armies

58

A Vision

68

Childhood.

58

Elegiac Stantas

69

Presentiments .

60

To the Daisy

60

" She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways"

61

Ode to Duty

61

We are Seven

62

An Incident at Bruges

62

The Solitary Reaper

63

Autumn.

63

" She was a Phantom of Delight"

63

A Mountain Solitude.

63

SIR WALTER SCOTT

64

The Trial of Constance

66

Hunting Song

68

The Cypress Wreath

68

Lochinvar,

69

Fitz-James and Roderick Dhu

69

A Bridal .

69

The Last Minstrel

70

The Teviot. .

70

Hellvellyn

71

A Scene in Branksome Tower

72

Farewell to the Muse

72

Melrose Abbey

72

JAMES MONTGOMERY

73

The Grave

74

The Pillow

75

Friends . .

76

Discovery and Conquest of America

76

Youth Renewed.

The Common Lot

• 77

The Stranger and His Friend

77

Incognita .

78

Speed the Prow.

79

Recluse

79

The Field of the World.

79

JAMES HOGG

80

Kilmeny

81

The Broken Heart.

82

The Skylark

82

Queen Mary's Return to Scotland

82

SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE

83

Dejection

84

Youth and Age .

85

Rime of the Ancient Mariner

86

Love

91

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GEORGE CRABBE

Stanza Let me not have this gloomy view"

Reconciliation

Woman

The Wretched Mind
The Dream of the Condemned
A Sea Fog
The Suddeo Death and Funeral
The Death of Ruth
A Group of Gipies
The Poor-House

Newspapers.
WILLIAM SOTHEBY

Rome
Tivoli.

The Grotto of Egeria
WILLIAM LISLE BOWLES.

Discovery of Madeira
Dreatoa of Youth.
To Time
Retrospection
Funeral of Charles the First
Remembrance
On be Rhine
Written at Ostend.

Matilda
SAMUEL ROGERS

An Epis'le to a Friend
On the Death of a Sister.
The Pleasures of Memory
Loch Long
Ginevra
The Four Eras
Don Garzia
The Fountain.

Venice

SIR EGERTON BRYDGES

Echo and Silence

The Approach of Cold Weather

The Winds

Ta Erening
To a Lady io Illness
To Automo, near ber Departure
To Mary
Hastings' Sospets
Soonet on Moor Park

Written August 20, 1807
Wri tea at Paris, May 10, 1825
Written at Paris, May 11, 1827

Written at Lee Priory, August 10, 1826
JOANNA BAILLIE

Birthday Lines to Agnes Baillie
To a Child
Christopher Columbus .
Patriotum and Freedom
From “ The Traveller by Night"
Constancy .

Song--- The morning air plays on my face"
ROBERT BLOOMFIELD.

The Bind. Boy
Address to his Native Vale
Harvest-Home

The Widow to her Hour-Glass
JOHN H. FRERE

Proem to a National Work, by William and Robert Whistlecraft

Sir Gawain

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Inscrip'ion for a Seat in the Groves of Coleorton.

Ayosiblul Port contemplating Nature

Evening in the Mountains

Skating

On Resisiting the Wye.

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WILLIAM HERBERT

Hy mp to Death

Adius the Unbeliever

Woman.

Farewell

Washington

SIR HUMPHRY DAVY

Tbe Tempest.

Fontainebleau.

Written aller Recovery from a Dangerous Illness.

On the Drah of Lord Byron.

Moot Blanc

The Sybil's Temple

A Fragment

The Eagles

The Fire-Flies

Life.

Thought

JOHN HERMAN MERIVALE.

Ode on the Deliverance of Europe, 1814

From Rufinus..

The Pursuit of Learning.

Answer to a Charge of Inconstancy

HORACE SMITH

Hymn to the Flowers

The Head of Memnon.

Doral Ruins

Address to an Egyptian Mummy

To the Alabaster Sarcophagus

Moral Alchemy.

THOMAS MOORE.

The Fire-Worshippers.

"The Harp that once through Tara's Halls"

Eveleen's Bower. .

"All that's bright must fade"

“011, in the stilly night" .

Sacred Song

“Has sorrow thy young days shaded ?"

“Oh, no!bot even when first we loved

CALEB C. COLTON.

The Conflagration of Moscow

Life .....

Irregular Ode, on the Death of Lord Byron

JOHN KENYON.

To the Moon

The Broken Appointment

EBENEZER ELLIOTT

Bothwell A Dramatic Poem

On Seeing Audubou's Birds of America"

The Press

The Dying Boy to the Slow Blossom

Come and Gone

Forest Worship

Ribbledin, or the Christening

The Wonders of the Lane.

Hymn-"Nurse of the Pilgrim sires, who sought"

Thomas

Sleep

The Pilgrim Fathers.

A Ghost at Noon.

Corn Law Hymn.

Flowers for the Heart

REGINALD HERER

Christmas Hymn.

The Widow of Nain

" Thou art gone to the grave"

Song-"There is, they say, a secret well"

Farewell

Missionary Hymn

The British Bow

Verses to Mrs. Heber

ALLAN CUNNINGHAM.

"A wet sheet and a flowing sea"

Gentle Hugh Herries

The Poet's Bridal-day Song.

"!'s Hame and it's Hame"

" The shepherd seeks his glowing heartb"

"Awake, my love !"

"My ain countree"

BERNARD BARTON

Spiritual Worship

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willIAM HERBERT

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THOMAS PRINGLE

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BERNARD BARTON.

To tbe Skylark .

Children of Light.

To Mary

Toa Profile.

Farewell

LEIGH HUNT

Extracts from the Legend of Florence

Agolasti agd his Lady.

A Domestic Seene

Fancy

To Lord Byron, on his Departure for Italy and Greece

The Fatal Passion

Kosciusko.

Ariadee.

Mahmoud

Power and Gentleness

The Glove and the Lions

An Angel in the House.

A Heaven upon Earth.

The Raveoga Pipe Forest.

The Nile ...

Abou Ben Adhem and the Angel

Spring in Ravenna

To a Child, during Sickness

BRYAN W PROCTOR

The Rising of the North

Stanzas-" That was not a barren time"

The Return of the Admiral

Forbidden Love.

A Repose

A Storm

«I die for thy sweet love

A Petition to Time

A Chamber Seene

The Lake has Burst.

The Weaver's Song .

A Prayer in Sickness

The Stormy Petrel

The Sea.

*Softly woo away her breath

A deep and a mighty shadow"

The Quatroon

An Epitaph

To the South Wind

Music

Flowers

Remembered Love.

Kings

Night Thoughts

Happiness

To the Singer Pasta .

Address to the Ocean

HENRY KIRKE WHITE

The Savoyard's Return.

Canzopet

* Pas pleased, and yet I'm sad"

To Consumption.

The Star of Bethlebem

To an Early Primrose

LORD BYRON.

2 The Lament of Tasso

The Dream

The Prisoner of Chillon

Waterloo

Monody on the Death of the Right Hon. R. B. Sheridan

The Isles of Greece

Soliloquy of Mapfred

Cecilia Metella

The Ocean.

To Thyra.

Starzas_** Away, away, ye botes of wo"

To Thyrza.

* Adien, adieu! my native shore"

The Erecution of Hogo

Death of Lara.

The Destruction of Sennacherib

Esening.

The Fate of Beauty

- She walks is beauty".

To Mary

"Oh! snatched away in beauty's bloom".

Manfred to the Sorceresa

* On this day I complete my thirty-sixth year".

* Afar in the Desert"

The Becbuana Boy

WILLIAM PETER.

Damon and Pythias

Theckla

The Ideal .

Christian Love

The Penitent

On a Dear Child

Twydee

RANN KENNEDY.

Domestie Bliss

The Merry Bells of England

Ambition

JOỤN WILSON

To a Sleeping Child

The Three Seasons of Love

The Hunter.

Signs of the Plague

'The Plague in the City

The Ship

Loes written in a Lonely Burial Ground

Address to a Wild Deer.

Lines written in a Highland Glen

JAMES SHERIDAN KNOWLES.

Love's Artifice.

Last Seene in John di Procida

The Growth of Love.

Artifice Disowsed by Love.

Pride of Rank

Tell among the Mountains

Lost Freedom of Switzerland

Virginius in the Forum

MRS. SOUTHEY

The Welcome Home.

Angling

Autumn Flowers

The Pasper's Death-bei.

The Mariner's Hymn.

HENRY HART MILMAN

Rowena

Lamentation over Jerusalem

Hymn by the Euphrates.

Jewish Hymn in Babylon

Ode, to the Saviour

The Merry Heart

Marriage Hymn

Evening Song of Maidens

Chorus" King of kinga! and Lord of lords !

Funeral Anthem

The Usurer.

Benina to Belshazzar.

JOHN KEBLE

Advent Sunday

The Flowers of the Field

The Nightingale .

Forest Leaves in Autumn

Dimness

Address to Poets

The United States

Champions of the Truth

CHARLES WOLFE

The Burial of Sir John Moore

"Oh, my love has an eye of the softest blue"

“Oh, say not that my heart is coll"

"If I had thought thou couldst have died”

PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY

2 The Sensitive Plant.

Love.

The Unattained

Dedication to The Revolt of Islam

From Alastor, or the Spirit of Solitude

Alastor and the Swan.

From The Revolt of Islam

Hymn to Intellectual Reauty

Song--Rarely, rarely, comest thou

Death and Sleep

A Picture

Spring

From Adonais: An Elegy on the Death of John Keats

"The serpent is shut out from Paradise".

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