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scious organization of thought, 288. Discussion

and disputation, 289. Reading vs. listening, 294.

The planned organization of thought, 295. The

critic, 299.

XXV The DETERIORATION OF SOCIAL STRUCTURES

300

Patronage, 300. Corruption, 302. Red tape, 303.

Indifferentism, 304. Formalism, 306.. Obsoles-

cence, 309. Absolutism, 312. Perversion, 315.

XXVI STRATIFICATION

Stratified society in Old Babylonia, 321. In the

later Roman Empire, 322. In eighteenth century

France, 323. In Old Japan, 324. In Tsarist Rus-

sia, 324. In Roumania, 325.

XXVII THE RISE of Gross INEQUALITIES .

Starting points of wealth differentiation, 326. Pri-

ority, 327. Booty, 327. Grants of land, 328. The

state as creator of inequality, 332. Laws and in-

stitutions making for inequality, 335. Static

times compared with dynamic times, 327. The

legitimation of ill-gotten fortunes, 339. Second-

ary differentiation, 341.

XXVIII GRADATION ..

· 343

Gradation according to occupation, 343. Honor-

ific employments, 344. Humilific employments,

345. Gradation according to riches, 348. Wealth

inherited outranks wealth acquired, 349. Deriva-

tive criteria of superiority, 350. Results of grada-

tion, 355-

XXIX SECREGATION AND SUBORDINATION

Why birth becomes everything, 358. Separation

of social classes, 359. The lower come into de-

pendence upon the higher, 361. Clientage, 363.

Peonage, 364. Subordination and fixity, 365.

Subordination and character, 366. Subordination

and charity, 367. The fate of closed classes, 368.

XXX EQUALIZATION -

370

Personal freedom, 371. Inalienable rights, 373-

The right to organize, 375. The downward per-

colation of culture, 376. The diffusion of eco-

nomic opportunity, 377. The spread of a margin

of leisure, 379. Educational opportunity, 380.

The democratization of government, 381.

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XXXI SELECTION

Natural selection or social selection, 386.

386. Obligatory celibacy, 387. Charity, 388.

inheritance of property, 389. Success, 390.

emancipation of women, 392.

XXXII SocializATION

The common scene, 395. Community of emot

experience, 396. The common meal, 397. Ro

the festival, 398. Group life, 400. Sport,

Community of interests, 405. Collision of

est, 407. Nationalization, 408. Disruptive

410. The expanded self, 411. Obstacles, 413

XXXIII ESTRANGEMENT

Economic developments which rouse antago

415. Genesis of discordant types, 417. Reli

schisms, 418. New ideas rend society,

Means of averting estrangement and strife

Antidotes to sect-forming, 422.

XXXIV Social CONTROL

The need of social control, 424. The motiv

hind it, 427. Its radiant points, 428. Its i

ments, 429. Economy and efficiency in socia

trol, 430. Law remains the corner stone, 43

XXXV SUPER-Social CONTROL

How the Kaiser's group dominated the G

mind, 433.

The schools and universities

The bestowal of decorations, 435. Need of

strongholds of free opinion, 436. School

omy, 437. The independence of foundations

XXXVI INDIVIDUATION

The Teutonic kindred, 439. The Chinese

441. The family, 442. The individuating

economy, 446. Individuating landholding

Individuating religion. Effect of heterog

of population and diversification of culture,

XXXVII LIBERATION

The liberal state, 450. Liberal religion, 451

cay of Puritanism, 453. Hero-worship, 454

ical thought, 455. Growth of like-mindednes

Of popular intelligence, 457. The libe

process in Japan, 458. Is socialism liberal?

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XXXVIII COMMERCIALIZATION

461

Why the profits motive has more play, 462. The

newspapers, 464. The lawyers, 465. Art, 466.

Amusement and recreation, 466. De-commercial-

ized mating, 467. De-commercialized religion,

468. De-commercialized government, 469.

XXXIX PROFESSIONALIZATION

472

Why are there professions? 472. Recognition of

the professions, 473. The professional spirit, 474.

Client vs. society, 476. Guild selfishness, 478.

The purification of the professions, 479. The

teaching of professional ethics, 480. Limits to

the extension of the professional spirit, 481.

XL INSTITUTIONALIZATION

485

Two types of institutions, 485. Illustrations, 486.

Advantages of the operative institution, 487. Its

disadvantages, 488. Institutionalism as a disease,

489. Dosing with personality is the remedy, 489.

XLI EXPANSION

491

The proselyting spirit, 491. Religious missions,

492. Revolutionary ideas, 493. The spirit of the

man of science, 494. Of the creative artist, 495.

Of the apostle of culture, 497. The expansive

force of nationality, 499. Imperialism, 500.

XLII OsSIFICATION

· 501

The process, 501. Its causes, 502. Its preven-

tives, 507. Ascendancy of the young, 507. Free-

dom of initiative, 507. The secular spirit, 508.

Balance among the groups of intellectuals, 508.

Freedom of inquiry, 509. Methods of exact meas

urement 510.

XLIII DECADENCE

511

Adverse climatic change, 511. Exhaustion of nat-

ural resources, 512. Subjugation, 515. Wastage

of natural ability, 515. Natural leaders dwarfed

or intimidated, 517. Ravages of the critical

spirit, 519. Instincts set above reason, 520. Rise

of a privileged caste, 522.

XLIV TRANSFORMATION

· 525

Statico-dynamic processes, 525. Transmutations,

526. What social evolution is, 527. The growth

PAGB

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