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ABDICATION. He was utterly without ambition (Chas. II.). He detested business, and would sooner have abdicated his crown than have undergone the trouble of really directing the administration. MACAULAY-History of England.

(Character of Charles II.).

Vol. I. Ch. II.
To see her abdicate this majesty to play at
precedence with her next door neighbor.
b. Ruskix-Sesame and Lilies. Of Queen's

Gardens. P. 92. (J. B. A., '85.)
I give this heavy weight from off my head,
And this unwieldy sceptre from my hand,
The pride of kingly sway from out my heart;
With mine own tears I wash away my value,
With mine own hands I give away my crown,
With mine own tongue deny my sacred state,
With mine own breath release all duteous

oaths.
Richard II. Act IV. Sc. 1. L. 204.

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ABHORRENCE.
The self-same thing they will abhor
One way, and long another for.
d.
BUTLER-Hudibras. Pt. I. Canto I.

L. 219.
I find no abhorring in my appetite.

DONNE-Devotion. Nature abhors the old.

f. EMERSON-Essays. Circles.
The arts of pleasure in despotic courts
I spurn abhorrent.
g. GLOVER-Leonidas. Bk. X.

Justly thou abhorr'st
That son, who on the quiet state of men
Such trouble brought, affecting to subdue
Rational liberty ; yet know withal,
Since thy original lapse, true liberty
Is lost.
Milton-Paradise Lost. Bk. XII.

L. 79.

For, if the worlds
In worlds enclosed should on his senses

burst *
He would abhorrent turn.

9. THOMSON-Seasons. Summer. L. 313.

h.

When it was become an abhorring even to them that had loved it best.

TRENCH-- Miracles. XXIX. 414.

ABSENCE. Absence makes the heart grow fonder. 1. Thomas HAYNES BAYLY-Isle of

Beauty.

a.

ABILITY. Men who undertake considerable things, even in a regular way, ought to give us ground to presume ability. BURKE- Reflections on the Revolution in

France. He could raise scruples dark and nice, And after solve 'em in a trice; As if Divinity had catch'd The itch, on purpose to be scratch'd. b. BUTLER,Hudibras. Pt. I. Canto I.

L. 163. You are a devil at everything, and there is no kind of thing in the 'versal world but what you can turn your hand to. c. CERVANTES-Don Quixote. Pt. I.

Bk. III. Ch. XI.

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The dwarf sees farther than the giant, when he has the giant's shonlders to mount on. d. COLERIDGE- The Friend. Sect. I.

Essay VIII.

In the hope to meet Shortly again, and make our absence sweet. p. BEN JONSON— Underwoods.

Miscellaneous Poems, LIX.

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Ever absent, ever near;
Still I see thee, still I hear;
Yet I cannot reach thee, dear!

9. FRANCIS KAZINCZY-Separation.

Every person is responsible for all the good within the scope of his abilities, and for no more, and none can tell whose sphere is the largest. g. GAIL HAMILTONCountry Living and

Country Thinking. Men and Women.

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To the very last, he [Napoleon) had a kind of idea ; that, namely, of la carrière ouverte aux talent—the tools to him that can handle them. h. LOCKHART-Sir Walter Scott. London

and Westminster Review, 1838. A Traveller at Sparta, standing long upon one leg, said to a Lacedæmonian, “I do not believe you can do as much.” “True,” said he, “but every goose can.” i. PLUTARCH-Laconic Apothegms. Remarkable Speeches of Some Obscure

Men.

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Read my little fable:

He that runs may read.
Most can raise the flowers now,

For all have got the seed. j. TENNYSONThe Flowers, Who does the best his circumstance allows, Does well, acts nobly; angels could no more. k. YOUNG-Night Thoughts. Night II.

L. 91.

There's little pleasure in the house
When our gudeman's awa.
W.J. MICKLE- There's Nae Luck Aboot

the House.

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A great mind is a good sailor, as a great heart is. k. EMERSONEnglish Traits. Voyage to

England. Chap. II.

The manly part is to do with might and main what you can do. 1. EMERSONThe Conduct of Life.

Wealth.

The good one, after every action, closes
His volume, and ascends with it to God.
The other keeps his dreadful day-book open
Till sunset, that we may repent; which doing,
The record of the action fades away,
And leaves a line of white across the page,
Now if my act be good, as I believe,
It cannot be recalled. It is already
Sealed up in heaven, as a good deed accom-

plished.
The rest is yours.
LONGFELLOW-Christus, The Golden

Legend. Pt. VI.

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