Raven Hill, Or, The Danish Fort: And Other Poems

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1858 - 119 sider
 

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Side 7 - What is this world? what asketh men to have? Now with his love, now in his colde grave Allone, withouten any compaignye.
Side 63 - I hear a voice, you cannot hear, Which says, I must not stay; I see a hand, you cannot see, Which beckons me away.
Side 90 - His memory long will live alone In all our hearts, as mournful light That broods above the fallen sun, And dwells in heaven half the night.
Side 114 - As thus the dying warrior prayed, Without one gathering mist or shade Upon his mind; Encircled by his family, Watched by affection's gentle eye So soft and kind; His soul to Him, who gave it, rose; God lead it to its long repose, Its glorious rest! And, though the warrior's sun has set, Its light shall linger round us yet, Bright, radiant, blest.
Side 7 - Are bristling into axe and brand, And every tuft of broom gives life To plaided warrior armed for strife. That whistle garrisoned the glen At once with full five hundred men, As if the yawning hill to heaven A subterranean host had given. Watching their leader's beck and will, All silent there they stood, and still.
Side 77 - The Norman kings, who succeeded the conqueror, dwelt with perfect safety in the southern districts, but did not venture north of the Humber without some fear; and a chronicler who lived at the close of the twelfth century assures us, 'that they never visited that part of the kingdom without being accompanied by a strong army.
Side 7 - That whistle garrisoned the glen At once with full five hundred men, As if the yawning hill to heaven A subterranean host had given. Watching their leader's beck and will, All silent there they stood, and still. Like the loose crags, whose threatening mass Lay tottering o'er the hollow pass, As if an infant's touch' could urge Their headlong passage down the verge, With step and weapon forward flung, Upon the mountain-side they hung.
Side 63 - Siverian, now Farewell ! I think we shall not meet again Till it be in that world where never change Is known, and they who love shall part no more. Commend me to my mother's prayers, and say That never man enjoy'da heavenlier peace Than Roderick at this hour. O faithful friend, How dear thou art to me these tears may tell...
Side 77 - ... successor Robert, who was the victim of papal tyranny, for daring to marry a distant cousin without the dispensation of the church. 2. The prevailing passion of the times was pilgrimage and chivalrous enterprise. In this career of adventure the Normans most remarkably distinguished themselves. In 983, they relieved the prince of Salerno, by expelling the Saracens from his territory. They did a similar service to pope Benedict VIII. and the duke of Capua; while another band of their countrymen...
Side 77 - Huntingdon) represents him as breaking out into sorrowful complaints, and exclaiming, " How shameful it is for me, that I have never been able to meet death in my numerous battles, but have been reserved to die with disgrace like an old cow. Clothe me at least in my impenetrable armour, gird me with my sword, cover my head with my helmet, place my shield in my left, and my gilded axe in my right hand, that I, the bold warrior, may also die like one.

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