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The reference is to the inclamatio already mentioned on I. 219. Supremum; not the acc. of the object, but the adverbial acc., the object being animam; we call upon his spirit with the last call, or for the last time. The last thing done at an interment was to bid farewell to the deceased by pronouncing the word vale. Gr. 380. 2. A. & S. 232 (3). — 69. Fides pelago. Cf. meis te fidere regnis, V. 800. Gr. 392. I. and 1. A. & S. 222, R. 8.—70. Auster; for ven71. Deducunt. See on I. 551. — 73. Sacra... tellus sacred land; i. e. Delos, the birthplace of Apollo and Diana. See on Ov. M. VI. 187, 190. · 74. Matri; Doris. See on II. 419. The dative limits gratissima. Aegaeo; applied to Neptune because he was supposed to delight especially in the Aegean sea. — -75. Pius= grateful; i. e. to his own birthplace and to the island which had sheltered his mother. Arcitenens; Apollo; i. e. as the bearer of the bow, the archer. Oras et litora. See on G. II. 44. — 76. E = to; lit. from; suggesting the notion of distance. — Mycono Gyaroque; two of the Cyclades, the former quite near, the latter at a considerable distance from Delos. -77. Immotam - dedit and rendered it fixed (so as) to be inhabited. — 79. Apollinis urbem ; Delos. -83. Hospitio; i. e. in consequence of the guest-friendship or tie of hospitality which had been already formed between Anius and Anchises. 84. Saxo... structa vetusto = vetusta; lit. built of old rock. The material is here conceived of as a means, and hence in the abl. without a preposition. — Venerabar = I began to venerate (the temple) and to pray. -85. Propriam. See on E. VII. 31. Thymbraee; an epithet of Apollo derived from Thymbra, a plain and city of Troas, where he had a temple. — 86. Mansuram that will remain, be permanent. Altera Pergama. The city is regarded as already existing in the persons of those who are to inhabit it. See on II. 703. — 87. Reliquias — Achilli. See on I. 30. -88. Quem sequimur; i. e. who is to be our guide? like quae -vito? v. 367. In both cases, the present shows the urgency of the request. They had started without any clear notion of their destination, v. 7. — 89. Pater. See on G. II. 4. Augurium is loosely used for an oracular response. See on v. 5. Animis -nostris is expressed as if the inspiration which Apollo gives to the seer (VI. 11) were imparted to the ordinary applicant at the temple. 90. Vix. See on II. 172. Omnia is explained by what follows. — 91. Liminaque. The lengthening of a short syllable is very rare when it ends in a vowel. Gr. 669. V. A. & S. 309 (1). — 92. Adytis... reclusis. So the temple flies open to give the reCortina; the tripod. - 93. Submissi― terram sponse, VI. 81. =we prostrate ourselves reverently upon the ground. 94. Duri = inured to hardships, hardy. Quae. See on quae, v. 27. A

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stirpe - tulit; i. e. the land where your ancestral stock first grew. - 95. Ubere laeto = with joyous fruitfulness, into her fertile bosom; perhaps with a reference to the image of a mother following. Gr. 414 and 3. A. & S. 247 and 2.-96. Matrem. Cf. G. II. 268. — 99. Mixto... tumultu; i. e. on account of the doubtful interpretation. Gr. 430. A. & S. 257. — 100. Moenia; i. e. the city which Apollo had promised by implication. -101. Quo; not referring to moenia, but introducing a separate question. – 102. Monu menta traditions. — 103. Spes; i. e. the object of your hopes. Cf. V. 672.104. Jovis... insula; as the birthplace of Jove. 106. Habitant; i. e. men inhabit: another way of saying centum urbes habitantur. Regna; each being an independent sovereignty. -107. Maximus... pater (sc. natu) our eldest ancestor; i. e. the founder of our race. There were two legends. According to one Teucer was a native of Troas, and the first king of Troy. Dardanus came to Teucer, received his daughter in marriage, and afterwards became his successor in the kingdom. According to the other Dardanus was a native prince of Troy, and Teucer immigrated into Troas from Crete, married the daughter of Dardanus, and succeeded to his throne. This double origin of the Trojan race is the cause of Anchises's mistake; but it seems from II. 781 that Aeneas should have set him right. -108. Rhoeteas. Troas is so called from the promontory of Rhoeteum on the Hellespont. 109. Optavit. See on I. 425.-110. Steterant. See on stant, v. 63. Habitabant. See on v. 106. — 111. Hinc; i. e. from Crete. Mater; i. e. of the gods. Cultrix Cybelae = the inhabitant of Cybele: a mountain in Phrygia, from which she derived her name. Corybantia aera= the brazen cymbals of the Corybantes; i. e. the priests of Cybele, who worshipped her in the forests and on the mountains of Phrygia with drums, cymbals, horns, and dances. —112. Idaeum nemus; i. e. where the rights of Cybele were celebrated. Fida — sacris refers to the mysteries of Cybele. Gr. 387. A. & S. 226. — 113. Cybele was represented as drawn by lions. All these are mentioned as derived by Phrygia from Crete. — 115. Placemus ventos; of sacrificing to the gods of the sea, as vv. 119, 120 show. Gnosia. See on G. I. 222. 116. Nec-cursu; about one hundred and fifty miles. Gr. 418 and 2. A. & S. 236. Juppiter may be mentioned as the god of the weather. See on E. VII. 60. dsit. Gr. 503. I. ; 505. A. & S. 263. 2 (1).—118. Aris. Gr. 422 and 1. A. & S. 254, R. 3. 119. Neptuno... Apollo. Neptune and Apollo are the tutelary deities of Troy; and there is a further reason for invoking them here, the one as the god of the sea, the other as having given the oracle. Pulcher Apollo. Cf. E. IV. 57. -120. Pecu dem; probably a lamb, which, V. 772, is offered under similar circum

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stances to the Tempestates.—122. Idomenea. Gr. 46. 3. 5). A. & S. 54. 5; 86. Idomeneus, a distinguished Grecian chief, led a band of Cretans to the Trojan war. The story is that on his voyage homeward he was overtaken by a storm and vowed to the gods of the sea that he would sacrifice the first thing that met him on landing, that this proved to be his son, that he fulfilled his vow, that a plague visited Crete, and that the inhabitants consequently expelled him, when he settled in Calabria, as mentioned in v. 400.-123. Hoste. Gr. 419. III. A. & S. 250. 2 (2). Vacare are without. Adstare stand ready to (our hand). Virg. expresses himself as if the Cretans had vacated the country as well as Idomeneus; but he may only mean that now that their chief was gone, the people would not be unwilling to receive the Trojans. -124. Ortygiae; the ancient name of Delos: lit. quail-island.—125. Bacchatam. See on G. II. 487. Jugis. Gr. 422 and 1. A. & S. 254, R. 3. Naxon. See on Ov. M. III. 636. Donysam; a small island east of Naxos. Viridem refers probably to its vegetation. — 126. Olearon; a small island west of Paros, belonging, like Donysa, to the group called Sporades. Niveam Paron; one of the Cyclades, famed for its white marble hence niveam. — 127. Cycladas. Virg. first specifies some of the individuals of the group, and then sums them all up in the general clause, sparsas― Cycladas. So the Sporades, referred to in the words crebris freta consita terris: thickly sown with numerous lands. Legimus we coast along... we traverse, pass through: zeugma. 128. Vario certamine with various emulation; i. e. striving to outdo each other. Cf. v. 290.-129. Hortantur encourage each other. Cretam — petamus; giving a notion of sailor language: For Crete and our forefathers, ho! Gr. 487. A. & S. 260, R. 6. — 130. Prosequitur has here its proper sense of acting as an escort or convoy. A puppi astern. Euntes as we go. 131. Curetum; the most ancient inhabitants of Crete, who worshipped Jupiter with noisy music and armed dances. They are sometimes identified with the Corybantes.-132. Optatae molior. See on I. 424, 425. —133. Pergameam; sc. urbem. Cognomine. Gr. 414 and 2. A. & S. 247 and 1.-134. Amare. Gr. 558. VI. 3. A. & S. 273. 2 and (b). Arcem - tectis = to build the citadel high with roofs. Gr. 414 and 3. A. & S. 247 and 2. — 135. Jamque. See on I. 223. Fere just; referring to the two next clauses as well as to the one in which it stands. Subductae. See on I. 551. — 136. Connubiis arvisque. Gr. 669. II. and 3; 384. A. & S. 306. I and (3); 223. Operata (sc. est) were occupied with. - 137. Jura - dabam; i. e. a settled government is established (cf. I. 426; V. 758), and houses (either sites, or buildings vacated by the Cretans, v. 123) apportioned. -137-139. Membris; with venit,

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like arboribus satisque. Tractu. Gr. 430. A. & S. 257. The passage may be freely rendered thus: Suddenly there came on the human frame a wasting sickness, shed from the whole tainted expanse of the sky, a piteous blight on trees and crops, a year charged with death. - 140. Linquebant-animas. The life is generally said to leave the man, not the man the life. Cf. V. 517.-141. Steriles; proleptic. Exurere. Gr. 545. I. A. & S. 209, R. 5. Sirius. See on G. I. 218.-142. Victum . negabat. Cf. G. I. 149. - 143. Remenso. Cf. II. 181. —144. Hortatur... ire. See on v. 134. Mari. See on tractu, v. 138. Veniam; i. e. a gracious answer to the questions which follow. See on I. 519. —145. Ferat... jubeat. Gr. 525. A. & S. 265. Ferat may be either tell or give. See on da, v. 85. -148. Effigies divum are the statues, not the appearances in vision. Cf. VII. 443. Penates. See on v. 12. - 150. Jacentis = as I lay. -150. In somnis, etc. We have here apparently a mixture of dream and vision, as in I. 355; II. 296, the moonlight belonging to the latter, the other circumstances to the former. -153. Affari... demere. See on exurere, v. 141. - 154. Dicturus...est; said rhetorically, as if Aeneas were certainly going to arrive there. — 155. Ultro; i. e. without waiting to be asked. See on II. 279.-156. Dardania= Troja. Arma secuti; sc. sunt. Cf. v. 54. —158. Idem; emphatic. Gr. 451. 3. A. & S. 207, R. 27 (a). — 159. Tollemus in astra; referring generally to the superhuman glory of Aeneas's descendants, rather than specially to the actual apotheosis of Caesar or Augustus. 159. Magnis: for your great gods: not, as is generally understood, the nepotes, but the magni Penates (IX. 258) or magni di who are speaking, the authors and impersonations of this national greatness. Cf. II. 295. —160. Fugae; as Aeneas is said, I. 2, to be fato profugus. —162. Delius; an epithet of Apollo, from Delos, the place of his birth. Aut. See on v. 43. Cretae. Gr. 424 and 1. A. & S. 221, R. 1.-163-166. Repeated from I. 530-533, where see notes. -167. Nobis illustrates magnis, v. 159. They identify themselves with the Trojans, or rather the Trojans with themselves. Propriae. Cf. v. 85. — 167. Dardanus... Iasius. It is difficult to reconcile the text with the legend; which was that Dardanus and Iasius were brothers, the sons of Corythus, an Etruscan prince of Corythus (Cortona), or of Jupiter by the wife of Corythus, that they emigrated from Etruria and settled, Dardanus in Phrygia, where he married the daughter of Teucer, and became his successor in the kingdom of Troy, and Iasius in Samothrace. In order to make Virg. consistent with himself, and with the line of tradition which he seems to have followed, we must suppose him to use pater vaguely, as a mere term of respect, like pater Aeneas, and to intend a quo to refer to Dardanus. The lan

guage is certainly against this, but by taking Iasiusque pater as parenthetical, the difficulty will be in a measure removed. Heyne and Wr. explain it thus: Dardanus cum Iasio, a quo Dardano.168. A quo principe = from which prince. 169. Surge age. See on v. 462. —170. Corythum; the place Corythus. Requirat. Gr. 488 and II. A. & S. 260, R. 6. —171. Ausonias Ausonian, Italian: from Ausones, a very ancient name of the primitive inhabitants of lower and middle Italy. Dictaea = Cretan. See on G. II. 536.-173. Sopor= = a deep sleep; i. e. favorable for a vivid dream. Illud; instead of ille, the usual attraction being neglected. — 174. Velatas; i. e. crowned with fillets. 175. Tum. The sentence is interrupted at deorum by the parenthesis, which produces an anacoluthon (see on I. 237), v. 175 introducing another sentence. Corpore. Gr. 425. 3. 4). A. & S. 251. — 177. Munera ... intemerata = offerings of unmixed and choice wine. —178. Focis. The hearth was the altar of the Penates. Honore the libation. Gr. 430. A. & S. 257. — 180. Prolem ambiguam the ambiguous (because capable of being referred to either source) lineage. Geminos parentes; Dardanus and Teucer. - 181. Se-locorum - that he had been misled by a mistake of a late day (novo) relative to ancient localities.-182. Exercite harassed. -183. Casus-fortunes: explained by what follows. - 184. Portendere; sc. eam. Debita; sc. fato. 185. Vocare = named. 187. Crederet. Gr. 486. 4. A. & S. 260, R. 2. Who would have thought so in those days? Cassandra. See on II. 246. -190. Quoque; i. e. as well as the one in Thrace. Paucis relictis; apparently introduced to account for the Pergamum or Pergamia, of a later day, as one of the cities of Crete. See v. 133.-191. Trabe=ship, as often. Aequor. Gr. 371. 3. A. & S. 232 (2). Cf. V. 235.—192. Nec jam amplius and no longer. -193. Apparent belongs to coelum et pontus as

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well as to terrae.—194. Imber a rain-cloud. 195. Inhorruit - tenebris the wave became ruffled amid the darkness. Gr. 414 and 2. A. & S. 247 and 1. The picture seems to be of the surface of the water roughened or curled, partly by the wind, partly by the darkness, which would change its outline to the eye. 196. Venti -mare. Cf. I. 86. Magna; with surgunt. -198. Involvere abstulit. Cf. I. 88.199. Ingeminant repeatedly flash. — 200. Caecis dark and unknown. -201. Negat discernere

= dicit se non discernere ; i. e. he cannot tell whether it is day or night. Gr. 545. 2. 1). A. & S. 239, R. 2. -202. Nec is used as if non dicit had preceded instead of negat. Meminisse scire. Palinurus; Aeneas's pilot. -203. Tres adeo... soles three long days. Adeo strengthens tres. Caeca caligine = by blinding darkness: join with incertos. - 206. Aperire to disclose. Volvere fu

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