The Origin and Growth of the English Constitution: The after-growth of the constitution

Forsideomslag
Houghton, Mifflin, 1898
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Indhold

The Military Dictatorship organized by Cromwell as Captain 66
346
THE RESTORATION AND THE REVOLUTION OF 1688
358
Charles Second Parliament prolonged for nearly Eighteen Years
365
Titus Oates alleged scope and purpose of the plot murder
376
CHAPTER II
392
until then
405
Constitutional Theory of the Houses embarrassed Military Opera
409
power to withhold supplies
419
law enlarged by acts passed from 1698
431
Right of placemen to sit in the houses great nobles as ministers in the house
441
Union of England and Scotland threat contained in Scotch Act of Settlement
447
three principles upon which parliamentary government now reposes modern
452
assumes the leadership with Townshend
460
An organized system of corruption applied to both electors and elected corrup
467
Right of the lower house to exclude strangers and to prohibit the publication
473
question
488
Freedom of the press as restrained by taxation stamp duty imposed in the reign
494
Pitt counselled George
519
cry for equalization Representation of the People
537
about sixty temporal peers who were generally exceeded in number by
539
The Cabinet and its Relations to the Crown and the Legislature
548
Royal revenue originally independent of legislative grants of what it originally
552
Out of the office of lord high admiral has grown the court of admiralty and depart
558
remains of its judicial authority
565
Sir J Hobhouses Vestry Act 1831 attempt to restore ancient popular constitu
573
Subdivision of counties for judicial and parliamentary purposes jurisdiction
580
new building raised upon the old groundwork
586
Summary of the growth of the modern ministerial system Revolution of 1688
592
copacy again abolished by general assembly in August Wentworth
637
Copyright

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 249 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges, and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Side 492 - ... the jury sworn to try the issue may give a general verdict of guilty or not guilty upon the whole matter put in issue upon such indictment or information; and shall not be required or directed, by the court or judge before whom such indictment or information...
Side 492 - That, on every such trial, the jury sworn to try the issue may give a general verdict of guilty or not guilty upon the whole matter put in issue...
Side 316 - May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here; and humbly beg your Majesty's pardon, that I cannot give any other answer than this to what your Majesty is pleased to demand of me.
Side 249 - ... that the Commons in Parliament have like liberty and freedom to treat of those matters in such order as in their judgments shall seem fittest; and that every such member of the said House hath like freedom from all impeachment, imprisonment, and molestation (other than by censure of the House itself) for, or concerning, any bill, speaking, reasoning, or declaring of any matter or matters touching the Parliament or Parliament business...
Side 312 - And we do here declare that it is far from our purpose or desire to let loose the golden reins of discipline and government in the Church, to leave private persons or particular congregations to take up what form of Divine Service they please, for we hold it requisite that there should be throughout the whole realm a conformity to that order which the laws enjoin according to the Word of God.
Side 359 - ... a liberty to tender consciences, and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matter of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Side 549 - Having once given her sanction to a measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister ; such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her Constitutional right of dismissing that Minister.
Side 415 - By causing several good subjects being Protestants to be disarmed at the same time when papists were both armed and employed contrary to law; 7.
Side 339 - that the People are, under God, the original of all just power; that the Commons of England in Parliament assembled — being chosen by, and representing, the People — have the supreme power in this nation...

Bibliografiske oplysninger