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CHAP. LXXXIII.

Vol. 11. C. 41. p. 204.

ATTEMPTS OF THE ENGLISH CATHOLICS TO OBTAIN

RELIEF, ON THE ACCESSION OF MR. FOX's MINISTRY IN 1806;—ALLEGED OBJECTION FROM HIS MAJESTY'S CORONATION OATH.

LXXXIII. 1.

Vol. II. C. 41. s. 1. p. 205.
General hopes of Relief entertained by the English

Catholics, at this time.

2. LXXXIII.

Vol. 11. C. 41. s. 2. p. 206. Objection to Catholic Emancipation, from the Coronation

Oath.

LXXXIII. 3.

Vol. 11. C. 41. s. 3. p. 208. The Conduct of Lord Grenville's Administration towards

the Catholics.

LXXXIII, 4.

Vol. 11. C. 41. s. 4. p. 216. Attempts of the Catholics for Relief, in the years 1808,

1810, and 1812.

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CHAP. LXXXIV.
Vol. 11. c. 42. p. 216.
THẺ BILL OF 1813.

LXXXIV. i.

Vol. 1i. c. 42. s. 1. p. 217. Mr. Butler's Address, in 1813, to the Protestants of the

United Empire.

LXXXIV. 2.

Vol. 11. C. 42. s. 2. p. 245. The Petition, presented by the English Catholics, in the

year 1810, to both Houses of Parliament.

LXXXIV. 3.
Vol. II. C. 42. s. 3. p. 253.

The Bill, brought into the House of Commons in 1813, for

Catholic Emancipation.

CH A P. LXXXY.

Vol. 11. C. 43. p. 268. ACT PASSED IN 1817 FOR REGULATING THE ADMI

NISTRATION OF OATHS IN CERTAIN CASES TO OFFICERS IN HIS MAJESTY'S LAND

AND SEA

SERVICE.

CH AP. LXXXVI.

Vol. 11. C. 44. p. 279.

THE PRELACY OF THE ENGLISH CATHOLIC CHURCH;

CLERGY; —AND CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS, SINCE THE REFORMATION.

LXXXVI. 1.

Vol. 11. c. 44. s. 1. p. 279.

The English Catholic Prelacy.

LXXXVI. 2.

Vol. II. C. 44. $. 2. p. 293.

Religious Establishments made by the English Catholics

in foreign Countries.

LXXXVI. 3.

Vol. II. C. 44. s. 3. p. 295.

Their charitable Establishments for the Education of the

Poor.

C H AP, LXXXVII.

PRINCIPAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE BRITISH AND

IRISH CATHOLICS BETWEEN THE YEARS 1813 AND 1821.

1813-1821. WE shall now present to our readers an account of the principal circumstances in the history of the British and Irish catholics, from the time which the preceding pages have reached, till the present.These are, I. The resolution of the English catholica in 1813, to persist in their endeavours to obtain a repeal of the remaining penal laws: II. The expulsion of doctor Milner from the private board, or the select committee of the general board of the British catholics: III. And the further petitions of the British and Irish catholics to parliament, and the proceedings upon them.

LXXXVII.

1.

The Resolution of the Board of British Catholics

in 1813

On the 29th of May 1813, which was almost immediately after the bill for the relief of the catholics was lost, the board of the British catholics passed two unanimous resolutions : by the first, they returned thanks to the members of the house of commons, who had supported the bill : by the second, they expressed their determination not “to

relax their efforts to procure relief from the pe“ nalties and disabilities, under which they suf“ fered.” The earl of Shrewsbury was in the chair: the resolutions were moved by Lord Stourton, and seconded by lord Arundel of Wardour.

LXXXVII. 2.

The Expulsion of doctor Milner from the private Board,

or the Select Committee of the General Board of the English Catholics.

While the bill had been pending in the house of commons, doctor Milner caused a memorial against it to be circulated among the members: and, in a postscript to it, stated explicitly that, “such measures “ never could have been countenanced by any mem“bers of the legislature, had they not been sug

gested by certain false brethren of the catholic body.” It proceeded to state that, “ many ca“ tholics in England, and many more in Ireland,

objected to the clause in the oath of 1781, respecting the protestant succession, as it might be

thought to bind them to take up arms against " their sovereign, if he should profess their reli“gion:” on this ground, he submitted a change in the terms, by which they should declare, “ their “ entire submission to the limitation of the pro" testant succession as established by law.” Upon the last head, the writer must observe, that he has never yet met with a single catholic, ecclesiastic or lay, who objected to the oath. It has been taken by all the bishops in Ireland, all their coadjutors,

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