Ballads and Sonnets

Forsideomslag
Ellis and White, 1881 - 335 sider
 

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Side 83 - Saved!" was the cry from many a throat. And down to the boat they leaped and fell: It turned as a bucket turns in a well, And nothing was there but the surge and swell. The Prince that was and the King to come, There in an instant gone to his doom, Despite of all England's bended knee And maugre the Norman fealty!
Side 306 - Strange to think by the way, Whatever there is to know, That shall we know one day.
Side 84 - Iwus a royal train put forth to sea, Yet the tale can be told by none but me, (The sea hath no King but God alone.) And now the end came o'er the waters' womb Like the last great Day that's yet to come.
Side 296 - I looked and saw your heart In the shadow of your eyes, As a seeker sees the gold In the shadow of the stream ; And I said, " Ah me ! what art Should win the immortal prize, Whose want must make life cold And Heaven a hollow dream ? " I looked and saw your love In the shadow of your heart, As a diver sees the pearl In the shadow of the sea ; And I murmured, not above My breath, but all apart, — " Ah ! you can love, true girl, And is your love for me ?
Side 111 - Or was it an eagle bent to the blast ? When near we came, we knew it at last For a woman tattered and old. But it seemed as though by a fire within...
Side 79 - And under the winter stars' still throng, From brown throats, white throats, merry and strong, The knights and the ladies raised a song. A song, — nay, a shriek that rent the sky, That leaped o'er the deep ! — the grievous cry Of three hundred living that now must die. An instant shriek that sprang to the shock As the ship's keel felt the sunken rock.
Side 78 - Is a songbird's course so swift on the wing?" And under the winter stars' still throng, From brown throats, white throats, merry and strong, The knights and the ladies raised a song. A song, — nay, a shriek that rent the sky, That leaped o'er the deep! — the grievous cry Of three hundred living that now must die.
Side 161 - Of its own arduous fulness reverent : Carve it in ivory or in ebony, As Day or Night may rule ; and let Time see Its flowering crest impearled and orient. A Sonnet is a coin : its face reveals The soul, — its converse, to what Power 'tis due ; — Whether for tribute to the august appeals Of Life, or dower in Love's high retinue. It serve ; or, 'mid the dark wharf's cavernous breath, In Charon's palm it pay the toll to Death.
Side 259 - A Superscription Look in my face ; my name is Might-have-been ; I am also called No-more, Too-late, Farewell ; Unto thine ear I hold the dead-sea shell Cast up thy Life's foam-fretted feet between ; Unto thine eyes the glass where that is seen...
Side 126 - And oft have I heard again in dreams The voice of dire appeal In which the King then sang of the pit That is under Fortune's wheel. "And under the wheel beheld I there An ugly Pit as deep as hell, That to behold I quaked for fear: And this I heard, that who therein fell Came no more up, tidings to tell: Whereat, astound of the fearful sight, I wist not what to do for fright.

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