Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

FOR YOUNG LADIES.

69 CHESTER SQUARE, BOSTON, MASS. REV. GEORGE GANNETT, D. D.

PRINCIPAL

LOCATION AND BUILDINGS. It has one of the most beautiful and desirable locations in the city. The school building was erected expressly for the purposes of the Institute, on the most approved plan of 'architecture and interior arrangements. The entire establishment is heated by steam, and has all the modern conveniences.

ORGANIZATION. - It was organized thirty-four years since, and its plan from the beginning has been eminently liberal and comprehensive.

DEPARTMENTS. — It has three departments, the Preparatory, Intermediate, and Senior. Thoroughness in character and methods of instruction characterizes each. The Senior Department embraces a four-years course, which includes the Higher Mathematics, History, Philosophy, the Sciences, Ancient and Modern Languages, Art studies and the various Literatures.

A PARTIAL course may be taken, or a selection of studies is permitted.

DIPLOMAS are awarded to those who shall have honorably completed the prescribed course.

TEACHERS AND PROFESSORS. In every department, such teachers and professors only are employed as have been enriched by years of eminent success in their work; and so large is the Board of Instruction, in proportion to the number of pupils, that an unusual division of labor is secured.

LIBRARIES. - A library of several thousand volumes, and a large and valuable Art Library, afford every incentive to reading, study, and research, outside of the text-books.

A HOME is found here for twenty-five young ladies and six of the lady teachers, who constitute a family of refining intimacies and social culture.

A LECTURE COURSE. — Lectures upon History, Literature, Philosophy, Science and Art are given annually, not to displace but to supplement the class-room training.

DRAWING AND PAINTING. - In this department a resident lady teacher of wellknown ability is occupied during all the school hours.

IN FRENCH, GERMAN AND ITALIAN, native teachers are employed.
TERMS for Day Pupils, from $80 to $200 per annum.

TERMS for Family Pupils: Board and Tuition, in English, French, Latin, German, Drawing, Penmanship, Physical Culture, and Lectures, $500 for the scholastic year.

The EXTRAS are Music, Painting, and Italian.
The thirty-sixth year commences Wednesday, Oct. 2, 1889.
For Catalogue and Circular, apply to

REV. GEORGE GANNETT, D. D., PRINCIPAL.

[blocks in formation]
[ocr errors]

265 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS.

ESTABLISHED 1867. LOW ESTIMATES, CAREFUL SERVICE, RELIABLE DEALING,

Are the Characteristics of this Agency, Principals of Schools and Colleges are invited to send for estimates before placing their contracts from year to year. Estimates furnished promptly, and free of charge.

GRINNELL, IOWA,

,

FIVE COURSES OF STUDY, VIZ, : 1. ENGLISA STUDIES : Introductory to Classical or Scientific, or preparatory for teaching. 2. ACADEMIC COURSES: Two or three years, preparing for higher courses. 3. COLLEGE COURSES : Four years, Classical, Scientific, and Literary.

4. MUSICAL COURSE : Including Vocal and Instrumenial Music and Harmony, occupying from two to four years.

5. DIDACTIC COURSE: Giving one year's work in the Theory and Practice of Teaching.

FALL TERM OPENS SEPT. 10, 1889.

TERMS OF ADMISSION.

Students from Higb Schools, Academies, and Seminaries admitted on certificate of scholarship and character without examination, so far as studies have been pursued. Unconditional admission after satisfactory examination in the following studies :

FOR THE CLASSICAL COURSE. I. Physiology, Physical Geography. II. Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry. III. History of United States, General History Civil Government. IV. English Grammar and Composition. V. Latin-Grammar, Composition, Cæsar 3 books, Cicero 5 orations, Virgil 5 books, Sallust. VI. Greek - one year's study.'

FOR THE SCIENTIFIC COURSE, the requirements are the same as for the Classical, exoept Greek, with additional Latin in place of Greek.

FOR THE LITERARY COURSE, the requirements are the same as for the Classical, except Latin and Greek,

IOWA COLLEGE is in its 43d year. It enjoys the reputation of being the oldest and best College in Iowa.

It is located at Grinnell, the junction point of the Central Iowa and the C., R. I. & P. R’ys, accessible to all parts of the Btate.

The rate of increase in number of students the last year is beyond that of any previous year.

The Grade of Scholarship has in no way been lowered. At the same time careful attention is paid to the moral and spiritual as well as the mental conditions of those in attendance. For Catalogues and other information, address,

GEORGE A. GATES, Pres. Or H. H. ROBBINS, Secretary.

WELLS COLLEGE,

FOR WOMEN,
AURORA, CAYUGA LAKE, N. Y.

FULL COLLEGIATE COURSE OF STUDY.

INSTRUMENTAL AND VOCAL MUSIC, DRAWING, PAINTING, ETO.

Location unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Buildings Elegant. Combines extended and thorough instruction with the essentials of a refined

Christian home. Terms moderate. Send for Catalogue. 1

SESSION BEGINS SEPT. II, 1889.

E S. FRISBEE, D. D., President.

.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]

HISTORY. THE work of founding Fisk University was begun early in October, 1865. It was clearly seen that Nashville was a strategic point, at which should be built up a great central institution on a foundation broad enough to enable it to provide for every educational demand that should arise in the development of the newly emancipated race. Hence, in 1867, a charter was secured for a university. The name was given in honor of Gen. Clinton B. Fisk, who most heartily and efficiently co-operated in its establishment, and who has ever since been President of the Board of Trustees.

RESULTS. Beginning with a people just emancipated, the growth of Fisk University fitly represents the educational progress of the race during a period of freedom covering less than a quarter of a century. When the "Fisk School” was started there were no public schools for colored chil. dren in Nashville, and there was no demand for instruction except in the simplest branches of a common-school education; the pupils were then all from the city. There are now in successful operation the following departments of instruction:I. THE COMMON ENGLISH, which has been maintained to meet a continued need on the part

of many of the patrons of the University. II. THE NORMAL, which bas a course of study extending over four years, beginning with

Latin and Algebra. IU. THE COLLEGE PREPARATORY, which has a course of study extending over three years,

beginning with Latin and Algebra, and requiring two years of Greek. IV. THE COLLEGE, which has a four-years course of study additional to that provided in the

College Preparatory Course. V. THEOLOGICAL Thus far the instruction in this Department has been fragmentary, but

plans are now being devised for the erection of an appropriate building for a Theological Seminary, and the enlarging of the Faculty, so as to provide a course of study covering

three years. VI. DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC, with an extended course in both instrumental music and voice

culture. There are over one hundred pupils in this Department. In addition, vocal music is taught throughout all the courses of study. The Mozart Society studies and

renders the Classics in music. VII. INDUSTRIAL. This important department of education has not been made a prominent

feature in the educational work of Fisk University. Printing and Carpentry are, how. ever, taught to classes of young men. The young women are instructed in Nursing, Cooking, and Sewing.

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS, The University has a campus of thirty acres, with buildings and other appliances for its educational work, which have cost $250,000.

ATTENDANCE. The present number of students is five hundred and eight. Twenty States are represented.

GRADUATES. There have been graduated from the College Department eighty, and from the Normal fifty. five. Many hundreds have received a good English education, which has fitted them for teach. ring and business. The present number of pupils in the Normal and College Departments nearly equals the entire number which has been graduated during the past twenty-four years. Of the Alumni ten have become ministers, six lawyers, five physicians, and most of the others hold important positions as educators. Three are missionaries in Africa.

ENDOWMENT. The University is without endowment. The annual expenses, above the small income from students, are met by voluntary contributions, made directly to the University, or through the American Missionary Association which founded the University and has continually fostered it. THE DEMAND IS NOW IMPERATIVE FOR AN ADEQUATE ENDOWMENT. Haply some one reading these lines may find pleasure in helping towards this endowment.

EXPENSES. The cost of room, board, and tuition is $12.00 per calendar month. Instruction in Instru. mental Music is fifty cents per lesson, including use of instrument for practice.

The Scholastic Year 1889-90 will open September 23d. For information address either of the undersigned.

Rev. E. M. CRAVATH, D.D., President.

Rev. E. C. STICKEL, Treasurer. NASHVILLE, TENN., June, 1889.

« ForrigeFortsæt »