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parish vestry, and by certain managers and attorneys in Barbados, is to be sanctioned and carried into effect, then farewell to the due religious instruction of the slaves, and to the honour and character of the Church of England in our West India possessions! But I will not anticipate an evil of such magnitude : I still indulge the hope, that by the exemplary conduct and wisdom of the Bishop, the breach may yet be healed, and even the vestrymen of St. Lucy may be brought to a better mind. Every friend to the planters and proprietors of those islands must wish most devoutly for such a result: had it been the intention of the planters, &c. of Barbados, to alienate from them all respectable men of all classes in this country, I am persuaded that measures more decisive in this view than those recently taken by them could not be devised, and no time should be lost in adopting a different system.

I am, &c.

A. B.

ON THE METHOD OF REASONING IN SERMONS. There is no stronger excitement to accuracy in reasoning than the expectation of a reply to our arguments ; no greater temptation to over-statement in our propositions, or incorrectness in our inferences, than the consciousness that no reply will be permitted. This temptation lies in the way of every preacher. We would therefore recommend those who are beginning to practise the composition of sermons to scrutinize their own arguments, as far as is in their power, with the watchfulness of an adversary; to consider with themselves how one who may differ in opinion on the point in band, would be likely to reply to what they propose to advance. They would thus learn never to over-state their subject,- never to put it forward in a false degree of importance, or to assert it with a pretence of certainty, beyond what they can sufficiently establish. The gainsayer would cease to triumph in the refutation of unsound arguments, and finding no point on which he can exercise his skill in reply, will be more likely to listen with a disposition to receive the truth.

C. G.

SERMONS IN AID OF THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN

KNOWLEDGE & SOCIETY FOR PROPAGATING THE GOSPEL.

Mr. Editor.-In your last number you have suggested“ as an excellent means of benefiting the Societies, that the clergy should, soon after the appearance of the annual Reports, inform their congregations of what had been effected during the preceding year." You will perhaps be gratified by learning that your advice is sanctioned by the opinion of the Maryland Convention, which has passed the following resolution:

Resolved, That this Convention being deeply impressed with the importance of missionary labours, both foreign and domestic, with a view to diffuse a proper understanding of the subject, and to awaken among the people a love and zeal for missions, do recommend to the Clergy of their diocese to read before their people at stated periods, at least once every three months, such an abstract of missionary information, as they may deem conducive to those objects.

M.

INSCRIPTION ON THE MONUMENT ERECTED IN MEMORY OF

BISHOP HEBER, AT MADRAS.
Composed by the Rev. Thomas Robinson, M. A.

M.S.
VIRI ADMODUM REVERENDI ET IN CHRISTO PATRIS

REGINALDI HEBER S.T.P.
PRIMO COLLEGII ÆNEI NASI IN ACADEMIA OXONIENSI ALUMNI

COLLEGII DEINDE OMNIUM ANIMARUM SOCII
PAROCHIE HODNET IN AGRO SUO NATALI SALOPIENSI REOTORIS
APUD SOCIETATEM HONORABILEM HOSPITII LINCOLNIENSIS PRÆDICATORIS

POSTREMO AUTEM EPISCOPI CALCUTTENSIS

QUI IN IPSO ADOLESCENTIÆ FLORE

INGENII FAMA

HUMANITATIS CULTU
OMNIGENÆQUE DOCTRINÆ LAUDE

ORNATISSIMUS

EA OMNIA IN COMMUNEM ECCLESL FRUCTUM AFFERENS

SE SUAQUE DEO HUMILLIME CONSECRAVIT

IN SANCTISSIMUM EPISCOPATUS ORDINEM

BONIS OMNIBUS HORTANTIBUS ADSCRIPTUS

ECCLESIÆ APUD INDOS ANGLICANE INFANTIAM

NON PRO VIRIBUS SED ULTRA VIRES

USQUE AD VITÆ JACTURAM

ALUIT FOVIT SUSTENTAVIT

ADMIRABILI INGENII CANDORE

SUAVISSIMA MORUM SIMPLICITATE
DIVINAQUE ANIMI BENEVOLENTIA

USQUE ADEO OMNES SIBI VINXERAT

UT MORTUUM

ECCLESIA UNIVERSA PATREM

ETIAM EXTERI PATRONUM CARISSIMUM

DESIDERARENT

NATUS DIE APRILIS XXI A.D. M DCC LXXXIII
SUBITA MORTE PRÆREPTUS JUXTA URBEM TRICHINOPOLIM

MORTALES EXUVIAS DEPOSUIT APRILIS DIE III
ANNO SALUTIS M DCCC XXVI ÆTATIS SUÆ XLIII EPISCOPATUS III

MADRASENSES

NON SOLUM CHRISTIANI SED ET ETHNICI

PRINCIPES MAGNATES PAUPERES

AD HOC MARMOR EXSTRUENDUM

UNO CONSENSU ADFUERE.

MEMOIR OF ARCHDEACON DAUBENY. The late Rev. Charles DAUBENY, fashionable place, which was crowded D.C.L. Vicar of North Bradley, Wilts, with foreigners of distinction and and Archdeacon of Sarum, was the English travellers; amongst the former second son of George Daubeny, Esq. was the Princess Dashkow, in whose a highly respected merchant of the city suite the Archdeacon was introduced of Bristol. This gentleman, descended at the courts of Berlin and Petersburg from an ancient and noble family, was in 1774; and returning to England in distinguished for his excellent under- improved health, in the autumn of the standing, exemplary piety, and zealous same year he proceeded to his studies attachment to the Church of England; at New College.

About two years and to his early and affectionate care the afterwards he was ordained deacon subject of this memoir thankfully attri- by Dr. Lowth, Bishop of Oxford, and buted the formation of those sound and the week following admitted into virtuous principles of which he expe- priest's orders by Dr. Terrick, Bishop rienced the value in after life. At the of London. In the course of the same age of eight years the Archdeacon was year he succeeded to a fellowship of placed under the care of the Rev. Mr. Winchester College. He had not reHarris, of Phillips Norton, Somerset, sided more than two years at Winand at thirteen years he was removed chester when the Vicarage of North to Winchester: his talents and indus- Bradley was offered to him. The try, which were manifested at an early living had never been occupied by a age, were here rewarded by two of the Fellow of the College, and had fallen College medals, and the peculiar pa- into a state of general dilapidation and tronage of the Head Master, the cele- disorder. Divine Service was perbrated Dr. Warton. But his progress formed only once on a Sunday, and in this honourable course was retarded was very thinly attended. The parish by a severe illness, the effects of which abounded in sectarians, and the pohe felt for several years. At the age pulation was wild and uncivilized. of eighteen he obtained a scholarship, The income of the incumbent was and afterwards a fellowship, at New reduced to about 50l. per annum. College, Oxford. About this time he Nothing indeed could be more discoulost his revered and excellent father, raging than the aspect of the place and and his mother did not long survive; its inhabitants; nor could any ministhus was he deprived at a critical pe- ter have undertaken such a charge, but riod of life of parental control, and the one who, like the Archdeacon, was comforts of a home, and obliged to seek possessed of some fortune. the protection of distant relations or The Archdeacon married Miss Barnaccidental friends. On attaining his ston, daughter of W. Grey Barnmajority he became possessed of an ston, Esq. of Woodford in Essex, a independent fortune; which, added to lady of independent fortune, aceoman elegant person and accomplished plished manners, and most "amiable mind, made his society much courted, character, who proved the source of and frequently placed him in situations his greatest happiness for forty-seven of temptation and danger. But the years. They at first resided at Clifton, precarious state of his health obliged the vicarage at North Bradley not him to be careful amidst the gaieties of being habitable. Here he renewed a College life ;-a circumstance he al- an old intimacy with the Rev. Mr. ways regarded as a merciful dispensa- Calcott, then vicar of Temple Church, tion. In 1770 he quitted England, Bristol; a man of primitive manners, to travel for the recovery of his health; great piety, and a divine of the old and after spending some time at Paris, school, to whom the Archdeacon always he wintered at Lausanne. Here he expressed himself much indebted for cultivated an acquaintance with the the correct notions which, in the early celebrated physician Monsieur Tissot, days of his ministry, he had imbibed who strongly recommended the waters on the fundamental principles of his of the German Spa: the Archdeacon sacred profession. It was most forpassed a second winter abroad at this tunate for the Archdeacon that he

married a lady whose religious feelings hour which he hoped might bring some and taste for retirement were in unison of the wandering sheep of his flock with his professional duties; they back to their church. Subsequently therefore quitted an elegant fashion- he delivered other lectures at the same able place without regret, to bury them- hour; but alas! his meritorious exerselves in a remote country parish, tions met with but partial success. totally devoid of society or local advan- Soon after their marriage the Archtages, for the sole purpose of devoting deacon and his lady lost their first themselves to the important chargo child; and afterwards they had to which he had undertaken. The Vi- lament the lingering illness of their car's first attention was directed to his eldest boy, a child of great promise. church and vicarial premises, which On his account they spent the winter were both in a miserable condition. of 1788-9 at Hyeres, in the south of The church was newly paved through- France. In the spring of 1789, they out; the east end, and beautiful win- passed through Paris, then in a very dow in the chancel built, and the disturbed state, and visited Versailles, whole completely repaired; the duty shortly before the destruction of the increased to full service, and the sacra- Bastille. From Paris they proceeded ment administered monthly: the vi- to Spa, for the purpose of consulting carage house was chiefly rebuilt, with a friend and eminent physician, by walls for the most part enclosing the whose advice they spent the ensuing gardens and premises :-several cot- winter in Italy. After a residence tages with their gardens were pur- of two years abroad, they returned chased and pulled down to enlarge the home in the hope that their child had premises. The accomplishment of all acquired health; but it pleased God these objects cost, in the first instance, . to remove him shortly afterwards from upwards of 30001. while the Vicar their anxious cares. In consequence could not possibly expect compensa- of suffering from the dampness of the sation for such expenditure, not hav- country, the Archdeacon and his Lady ing at any time raised the vicarial usually passed the winter at Bath, the tithes so high as 1801. per annum. But parish being left under the care of a the object which he desired was at- resident curate. At a short distance tained: — the vicarage of North from the vicarage the Archdeacon Bradley was made worthy the accep- built a parsonage house, which has tance and residence of the future Fel- always afforded most comfortable aclows of Winchester College. The commodation for his curates. For ignorance and barbarous manners of several years the Archdeacon was the population at this time were such, anxiously engaged in promoting a plan that they opposed their worthy pastor which he originated, to erect a Free in all his plans and improvements, and Church in the city of Bath, where would often pull down his walls while church accommodation for the lower building, and destroy the trees recently classes was grievously wanted. After planted. But this zealous minister inviting the attention of the public by had evils of a still more disheartening some letters in the Bath paper, he nature to encounter in a place overrun preached a sermon on this subject at with dissenters of the worst kind, who Queen's Square Chapel, which so were alike unmoved by the friendly deeply interested his hearers, that advice, unbounded charities, and per- 12001. were immediately subscribed. sonal exertions of their pastor. In He hiinself contributed about 5001., 1785 he published a friendly and af- and was indefatigable in promoting fectionate address, &c. to his parish- this pious work, drawing the plans ioners, with prayers for families an- himself, and closely superintending the nexed: three years after he printed structure of the Church. The first his Lectures on the Church Catechism, stone was laid in 1795; and in 1798 which were originally delivered from this handsome building, containing the desk to the children of his Sunday free sittings for 1360, exclusive of the School, as evening lectures; which, galleries, was consecrated by Dr. Moss, with evening prayers, formed a third Bishop of Bath and Wells, and called service at the Church at six o'clock, an Christ Church. Thus this zealous

VOL. X. NO. I.

H

man had the satisfaction of laying the Steeple Ashton, to whom he gave very foundation stone, and completing the particular directions respecting it. He first free church that was ever erected spoke of it with enthusiasm, as if a in this country, and of officiating vision was before his eyes. Having therein as minister for fifteen years. settled all things relating to this object, The success with which this example so dear to his heart, he dismissed all has been followed was always a high earthly cares, and partook of the sagratification to his mind. Dr. Doug- crament with his family. His mind lass, Bishop of Sarum, frequently was in a most happy state; he frecame to Bath for the benefit of his

quently spoke of his readiness to die, health, and was well acquainted with and his desire to quit the world: his Mr. Daubeny. In 1805 he offered sole anxiety appearing to be to reconhim the Archdeaconry of Sarum in cile his family to an event which he terms highly flattering and gratifying felt to be inevitable, and which they to his feelings. In 1808-10 the Arch- were hourly expecting. In this state deacon built and endowed an alms- he continued for several days; when house and school in his own parish. early one morning he addressed his The endowment for the pensioners in daughter, who was watching by his this asylum, together with a salary bed-side with undiminished fears, “I for the schoolmistress, is vested in the believe now that I shall recover; I have Warden and Fellows of Winchester been told that my work here is not yet College.

done : God will raise me up to do his Towards the close of 1816, the work, in completing the church which Archdeacon had a paralytic stroke, I have in hand.” From that hour, to which affected the left side, and also the astonishment of all, his spirits and his articulation; but his intellects were strength gradually revived, and he not in the slightest degree impaired; he seemed as firmly persuaded of his ultirecovered from this attack in an extra- mate recovery, as he had before been ordinary manner, and never afterwards of his death. About three months appeared to suffer from its effects; re- from this time, he was sufficiently taining to the last the full vigour of strong to return to North Bradley, his faculties, both of body and mind. and shortly after the foundation The year following he built a Poor- stone of the new church was laid. house, capable of containing twelve The Archdeacon, although in his persons, which was completed and seventy-seventh year, rose before six in opened in the year 1818. The Arch- the summer, and about seven in winter. deacon had, previous to this, given up He usually passed the first half-hour in his ministry at Christ Church, Bath, his his garden, where he was wont to sing health not permitting him to undertake the Morning Hymn and other chaunts the evening duty; but he continued with great power and cheerfulness; he to officiate in his parish at North then went to his devotions and reading Bradley throughout the summer. А until breakfast; he afterwards retired considerable part of his parish called to his study, from which, except when Southwick and Rode, being too distant in the country, he seldom departed till to attend their parish church, the Arch- summoned to join his family at dinner. deacon, in 1822, entered into a propo- In the evening his son-in-law generally sal for erecting a Free Church. The read aloud for his amusement until he Warden and Fellows of Winchester retired to his study, a short time preCollege, several of the Bishops, and vious to going to bed. Thus, amidst other friends to the Establishment, his children and grandchildren, passed subscribed liberally to the undertaking; the evening of this good man's life, and the plans of the new church were their chief aiin being to wean him as all drawn, when the Archdeacon was much as might be from his studies; taken so severely ill, that his life was but it was in vain; he always replied for some time despaired of. During “that he could not be idle, and would his illness his mind was dwelling con- not be useless; that he must work so stantly upon the intended new church. long as he could, and wished to die in He requested to see his old and valued the harness." friend, the Rev. Samuel Hey, of The new church was completed

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