The Book of Human Character, Bind 1

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Who begin in Distrust and finish in Confidence
17
Who are supposed to be known by Epithets applied to them
19
PAGE PAGE 45
20
Who spin too finely
24
Lookerson
26
Who confine themselves only to one Part of their Sub ject
27
Who give wrong Names to Things
28
Who are supposed to be best known by their Conduct at Home
29
Who affect Impartiality
30
Who are best described by Negatives
31
Who go Abroad and see Nothing
32
Who are on a Level with their Art and Age 1
33
Who march before the public Mind
34
Who never alter their Opinions
35
Who are supposed to be known by their Prayers casual Speeches c
36
Who love Justice and yet have no Judgment
37
Nosce teipsum
38
Who are best known from their Enemies
39
Who have Power to detect Merit
40
Who do not do Justice to their own Powers
41
Whose one bad Quality neutralizes their Virtues
42
Who are known by their Mottos
43
Who set another Mans one Error against the thou sand of their own
44
Prejudices
45
Who see Men too nearly
46
Who may be approached
47
Who may be judged of from light Circumstances
48
Who are valued at a Distance
49
Detectors of Errors
50
Nations too highly appreciated
51
Who inay be judged of by their Furniture
54
Who are known by their Dress
55
Who desire to reduce all Men to their own Level
56
Who give premature Opinions
57
1
63
90
90
PAGE
93
Who are known by their Manners at Play
97
or condemn
99
Lovers of Detraction
101
Whose Abuse is fatal
102
Who take Praise to others as Censure on themselves
104
Prejudices in respect to ancient Times
105
Who are ever ready to throw the Blame off their own Shoulders
110
Who are enamoured of Deformity
113
Who believe all Misfortunes to be Faults
114
Lovers of Low Company
115
Who study Deformity the better to judge of Beauty
116
Who judge Others by Themselves
118
Who are unable to estimate the Times in which they live
119
Who will permit no one to be a Prophet in his own Country
122
Judging of Men
125
Who are known by the Titles of their Works
128
Who praise the Places in which they are not
129
Who think nothing worth having they have not
133
Authors judged of from their Heroes
135
Who are not to be deceived by fine Qualities
138
Palliators
139
Who accuse others of what they are guilty of them selves
141
Who appreciate maliciously
144
Who assign weak Motives in preference to strong ones
146
Who see clearly and yet represent superficially
147
Who are known by their literary Preferences
149
Who judge the World as if it were an Opera
150
Who spell Men backwards
151
Who read Men the wrong way
152
Who yield to Prejudice
154
Who never commend but with a But
156
Rochefoucault
157
Who affect to depreciate what they Love
163
Who are destitute of Precision
180
291
189
Who are ignorant of their own Writings
192
Whose Opinions we value only in part
193
Who admire no one whom they chance to see or to know
196
Who admire what they do not understand
199
Who value Men no longer than they agree with them in opinion
200
Who may be known by their Subjects
201
Who convert Vices into Virtues as long as they are friendly but who turn when they cease to be so
205
Who condemn for doing and not doing
206
Who adopt one Rule and apply it to all occasions
207
Who resemble and yet are seldom associated
208
Who are like only in one Thing
210
Who may be known by their Writings in general
212
Who conquer Prejudices
213
Counterparts
215
Who draw their own Portraits in that of their Enemies
218
Who form themselves on Models
219
Open Characters
222
Selfconfessors
223
Who draw their own Characters
225
Whose Qualities are strangely mixed
228
Who form Studies
230
Who being innocent have no regard to Appearances
233
Who are good at one Time and bad at another
234
Who do neither Good nor Evil
235
Men of honour honourable Men
237
Selfcontrasts
238
Who commit Evil for the sake of the Good
247
Who do good Actions with vile Motives
249
Bad Men who have done good Actions
250
Who have innocently committed bad Actions
252
Who form classes of themselves
253
Who have committed bad Actions with noble Views
255
Who are cruel in general yet clement in particular
256
Who delude themselves into a belief that they have done no bad Actions
257
Simplicity of Character
261
Who are combinations of Solecisms
262
Who suspend their natural Characters
263
Who are different at different Times
264
Who are different in different Places
265
Who act against their own Dispositions
267
Who act contrary to their real Characters
268
On human Inconsistencies
269
Inconsistencies of eminent Men
271
Who are inconsistent only in Appearance
274
Who resemble eminent Men in Part
279
Motives
280
On the Ease with which the Healthy can prescribe for the Sick
283
Who make no Allowances for Temptation
284
The Tempters and the Tempted
286
Weaknesses of eminent
289
Whose Actions cannot be adequately appreciated
290
Whose Characters do not appear till the Time for Action arrives 166 Men in Masquerade
291
Persons whom it is difficult to know
292
Who are not appreciated till after they are dead
294
Who are condemned for the Want of giving Explana
295
tion
296
Who neglect small Things
297
Who are blamed unjustly
300
Difficult and easy Virtues
302
Who unite Elegance to Strength and Vulgarity to Elegance
308
Who judge others by themselves
311
Who judge Men by their Countenances
314
Who cannot follow their own Lessons
329
Orders of Men in respect to Dexterity
330
Lovers of Uncertainty 179 Livers of Finesse
331
Whose Lives are perpetual Series of Struggles
332
Who turn on those who successfully continue their own Game
333
Who are ever in haste about Nothing 183 Who are always defending 184 Who take advantage of virtuous Sentiments to do un worthy Actions 185 ...
334

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Side 319 - Shorn of his beams ; or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs. Darken'd so, yet shone Above them all the archangel ; but his face Deep scars of thunder had intrench'd ; and care Sat on his faded cheek ; but under brows Of dauntless courage, and considerate pride Waiting revenge...
Side 137 - The idea of her life shall sweetly creep Into his study of imagination, And every lovely organ of her life Shall come apparell'd in more precious habit, More moving-delicate and full of life, Into the eye and prospect of his soul, Than when she liv'd indeed...
Side 78 - Mercury, And vaulted with such ease into his seat As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds, To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus, And witch the world with noble horsemanship.
Side 305 - Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually.
Side 54 - Fools ! Who from hence into the notion fall, That vice or virtue there is none at all. If white and black blend, soften, and unite A thousand ways, is there no black or white?
Side 220 - Study therefore the great works of the great masters, for ever. Study as nearly as you can, in the order, in the manner, and on the principles, on which they studied. Study nature attentively, but always with those masters in your company ; consider them as models which you are to imitate, and at the same time as rivals with whom you are to contend.
Side 302 - What, what is virtue, but repose of mind, A pure ethereal calm, that knows no storm ; Above the reach of wild Ambition's wind, Above those passions that this world deform, And torture man, a proud malignant worm ? But here, instead, soft gales of passion play, And gently stir the heart, thereby to form A quicker sense of joy ; as breezes stray Across th' enliven'd skies, and make them still more gay.
Side 304 - Mortals, that would follow me, Love Virtue ; she alone is free. She can teach ye how to climb Higher than the sphery chime; Or, if Virtue feeble were, Heaven itself would stoop to her.
Side 311 - What a confused chaos ! What a subject of contradiction ! A professed judge of all things, and yet a feeble worm of the earth ; the great depository and guardian of truth, and yet a mere huddle of uncertainty ; the glory and the scandal of the universe.
Side 136 - The playful humour ; he could now endure (Himself grown sober in the vale of tears) And feel a parent's presence no restraint. But not to understand a treasure's worth Till time has stolen away the slighted good, Is cause of half the poverty we feel, And makes the world the wilderness it is.

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