The Book of the Rose

Forsideomslag
Macmillan, 1910 - 356 sider
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Side 92 - Superphosphate of lime, 12 parts. Nitrate of potash, 10 parts. Sulphate of magnesia, 2 parts. Sulphate of iron, 1 part. Sulphate of lime, 8 parts.
Side 2 - Foster-Melliar, we read : I look upon the plant in most cases only as a means whereby I may obtain glorious Roses. I do not consider the Rose pre-eminent as a decorative plant ; several simpler flowers, much less beautiful in themselves, have, to my mind, greater value for general effect in the garden, and even the blooms are, I imagine, more difficult to arrange in water for artistic decoration than lighter, simpler, and less noble flowers. It must be remembered that the Rose is not like a bedding...
Side 95 - ... lower down or even from the very base of the plant, and this soon absorbs the majority of the sap and will eventually starve the original shoot, and be itself thus starved in succession by another. A rose in a natural state has thus every year some branches which are becoming weakened by the fresh young shoots growing out below them. This is one of the principal reasons why pruning is necessary. A rose is not a tree to grow onwards and upwards, but a plant which in the natural course every year...
Side 2 - ... we read : I look upon the plant in most cases only as a means whereby I may obtain glorious Roses. I do not consider the Rose pre-eminent as a decorative plant ; several simpler flowers, much less beautiful in themselves, have, to my mind, greater value for general effect in the garden, and even the blooms are, I imagine, more difficult to arrange in water for artistic decoration than lighter, simpler, and less noble flowers. It must be remembered that the Rose is not like a bedding plant, which...
Side 204 - to show how roses may be J- grown in the best possible manner so as to produce the finest blooms " ; and from his enthusiastic love and his long, successful culture of the flower, he has written such an exhaustive treatise that the reader who has the ambition, the energy and the means to follow his instructions cannot fail to achieve success. He gives clear and comprehensive details as to soil...
Side 207 - Niel, for instance, so highly estimated by some, being not a pleasant one to my senses. In fact, the judging of fragrance would have to be a matter for experts, properly trained, as tea-tasters are, for the part. Such persons, who have made the matter a special study, tell us that there is no scent of tea among what we call Tea Roses, but that some of them, like Mare'chal Niel and Madame Bravy, have a fruity scent resembling the raspberry, that Safrano has the odour of pinks, the Macartney Rose of...
Side 169 - Cant's directions for the use of this remedy are : " Take 4 oz. of quassia chips and boil them ten minutes in a gallon of soft water ; then strain it, and while cooling dissolve in it 4 oz. of soft soap : to this may be added another gallon or two of water." The plants should be syringed with this in the morning or evening, not in the sunshine, or badly infested shoots may be dipped in it. Pure water should follow the next day to cleanse the leaves and shoots. There are many insecticides advertised,...
Side 109 - ... well nourished, will be very rapid. Probably all the shoots will not reach the top of the house this year, but they should be allowed to grow as far as they will, and to ramble anywhere where there is room when they have reached the top, till growth ceases for the winter. If the pitch of the roof...
Side 96 - To maintain the life and strength equally throughout the plants, to mould and preserve their shape, and to give more vigour, colour, and substance to the flowers.
Side 60 - Eoses are going to be cultivated, and not neglected, is a great secret of success. A good piece of advice is to mark the line of soil upon the plant, and be careful not to cover it deeper than it was before ; and a bad one is to plant deeper in light soil to avoid the drought. The principle of shallow planting and dependence on horizontal surface roots is well understood by gardeners in the case of fruit trees ; they will take much pains to cut the tap-roots, and will even " lift " the roots of their...

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