Writings and Speeches, Bind 5

Forsideomslag
Little Brown and Company, 1901
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 49 - In the corrupted currents of this world Offence's gilded hand may shove by justice, And oft 'tis seen the wicked prize itself Buys out the law; but 'tis not so above; There is no shuffling, there the action lies In his true nature, and we ourselves compell'd Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults To give in evidence.
Side 197 - ... economy. Economy is a distributive virtue, and consists not in saving, but in selection. Parsimony requires no providence, no sagacity, no powers of combination, no comparison, no judgment. Mere instinct, and that not an instinct of the noblest kind, may produce this false economy in perfection. The other economy has larger views. It demands a discriminating judgment, and a firm, sagacious mind.
Side 333 - France, to hunt for a shameful and ruinous fraternity with this odious usurpation that disgraces civilized society and the human race. And is, then, example nothing? It is everything. Example is the school of mankind, and they will learn at no other.
Side 312 - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensiroi,. ir. 45 ble operation, like that of the air we breathe in. They give their whole form and colour to our lives. According to their quality, they aid morals, they supply them, or they totally destroy them.
Side 327 - All human Laws are, properly speaking, only declaratory ; they may alter the mode and application, but have no power over the substance of original justice.
Side 201 - In that way of putting things together, his Grace is perfectly in the right. The grants to the house of Russell were so enormous as not only to outrage economy, but even to stagger credibility. The Duke of Bedford is the leviathan among all the creatures of the crown. He tumbles about his unwieldy bulk; he plays and frolics in the ocean of the royal bounty. Huge as he is, and while "he lies floating many a rood,
Side 134 - To provide for us in our necessities is not in the power of government. It would be a vain presumption in statesmen to think they can do it. The people maintain them, and not they the people. It is in the power of government to prevent much, evil ; it can do very little positive good in this or perhaps in any thing else.
Side 166 - I had my chalk to draw any line, was this: that the state ought to confine itself to what regards the state or the creatures of the state : namely, the exterior establishment of its religion ; its magistracy ; its revenue ; its military force by sea and land ; the corporations that owe their existence to its fiat ; in a word, to everything that is truly and properly public, — to the public peace, to the public safety, to the public order, to the public prosperity.
Side 184 - He was a man of admirable parts; of general knowledge ; of a versatile understanding fitted for every sort of business ; of infinite wit and pleasantry ; of a delightful temper ; and with a mind most perfectly disinterested. But it would be only to degrade myself by a weak adulation, and not to honour the memory of a great man, to deny that he wanted something of the vigilance and spirit of command, that the time required.
Side 25 - He well knows two things : first, that no wise or honest man can approve of that partition, or can contemplate it without prognosticating great mischief from it to all countries at some future time ; secondly, he knows quite as well, that, let our opinions on that partition be what they will, England, by itself, is not in a situation to afford to Poland any assistance whatsoever.

Bibliografiske oplysninger