Confessions of an English Opium Eater

Forsideomslag
Penguin, 27. mar. 2003 - 296 sider
'Confessions' is a remarkable account of the pleasures and pains of worshipping at the ‘Church of Opium’. Thomas De Quincey consumed large daily quantities of laudanum (at the time a legal painkiller), and this autobiography of addiction hauntingly describes his surreal visions and hallucinatory nocturnal wanderings though London, along with the nightmares, despair and paranoia to which he became prey. The result is a work in which the effects of drugs and the nature of dreams, memory and imagination are seamlessly interwoven. Confessions forged a link between artistic self-expression and addiction, paving the way for later generations of literary drug-users from Baudelaire to Burroughs, and anticipating psychoanalysis with its insights into the subconscious. This edition is based on the original serial version of 1821, and reproduces the two ‘sequels’, ‘Suspiria De Profundis’ (1845) and ‘The English Mail-Coach’ (1849). It also includes a critical introduction discussing the romantic figure of the addict and the tradition of confessional literature, and an appendix on opium in the nineteenth century.
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Brugervurderinger

5 stjerner
3
4 stjerner
3
3 stjerner
0
2 stjerner
1
1 stjerne
0

LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - allyshaw - LibraryThing

"...here was the secret of happiness, about which philosophers had disputed for so many ages, at once discovered; happiness might now be bought for a penny, and carried in the waistcoat-pocket ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - AlCracka - LibraryThing

"First published in 1821, it paved the way for later generations of literary drug users, from Baudelaire to Burroughs." Whee! While this is maybe not indispensable, it's also not more than 100 pages ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

Indhold

VII
3
VIII
89
IX
191
X
247
XI
255
XII
260
Copyright

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Om forfatteren (2003)

Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859) studied at Oxford, failing to take his degree but discovering opium. He later met Coleridge, Southey and the Wordsworths. From 1828 until his death he lived in Edinburgh and made his living from journalism. Barry Milligan is Professor of English at Wright State University and author of Pleasures and Pains (Virginia UP, 1995).

Bibliografiske oplysninger