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bave memories. We have received from our highly valued correspondent at Constantinople a translation of the celebrated Oriental tale of · Laila and Medgenoon.' This, our friend informs us, is the tale of the East, (its author unknown,) and has been translated by numerous Arabian, Turkish, and Persian writers. The present translation is from the Turkish version of the Arabic. Look therefore, O reader! to see Romeo and Juliet outdone, in the gorgeous language of the Orient. Our friend promises us also a second paper upon · The Plague in Constantinople,' Scenes in the Turkish Capital, during the Holy Moon of Ramazan,' and · The Cries of Constantinople.' His favors will be cordially welcomed by our readers. The following are among the papers filed for speedy insertion: 'Some Recollections of the Navy-Island War,' "Gossip of a Player,' “ Reminiscences of a Dartmoor Prisoner,'· L'Envoi,' by H. W. ROCKWELL, Esq., * ANNIE Gray, a Christmas Chime;' • Dirge for an Insant,' • They Met,' etc, Noti. CES of several new publications are unavoidably postponed until our next. Among the books received at a late hour, we may mention (for we can do no more) · Dr. Blair's Ser. mons, with the Life and Character of the Author;' an excellent and handsome volume, just published by Messrs. J. S. TAYLOR AND COMPANY, and Evening Hours,' a collection of poems by Thomas R. WHITNEY. Let us not forget to announce also that Mr. F. G. BERTEAU has issued proposals for · The French Review,'a monthly work, which the growing taste for French literature among us will render acceptable to a very large class of readers, American as well as French. Messrs. Burgess, STRINGER AND COMPANY, tasteful and liberal publishers, whose reputation and business are extending in an equal ratio, have just issued a very pretty little brochure, with engravings, ' containing all the information which is interesting to the world of dancing at the present time. The dances described are limited to those which are the most fashionable and approved. The editor has bestowed especial pains on the description of the Polkas' and the · Valse à Deux Tems.' His information has been chiefly derived from Monsieur CELLERIUS, whose reputation as one of the best maitres de danse in Europe is a sufficient guarantee for the correctness of the various figures. Some of the Polka' directions are rather odd ; for example: * At a given signal, the six couples polk again round the room, and resume their places.' This poking around the room must be a graceful mouvement! The publishers of the popular · Polka' have also in press two nouvellettes by Mr. W. G. SIMMs, called . Castle Dismal, a Domestic Legend,' and · Helen Halsey, a Border Story.' They will soon be published.

THE LITERARY SOUVENIR: INGOLDSBY LEGENDS. — - Messrs. CAREY AND Hart, Philadelphia, have issued a smaller and less expensive annual than their “Gift,' entitled as above, which we think will find a liberal sale. The engravings are ten in number, various in kind, and well-executed. The character of its contents are highly creditable. 'Literary merit has been the standard,' so it is alleged,

by which every piece in it has been judged.' The tales are not of the light and trashy kind which frequently find their way into annuals, but are written with a purpose; and their perusal will leave a vivid impression of their characters, scenery, and moral on the reader's mind. Much of the poetry is very good, and some of it proceeds from distinguished writers, among whom we are glad to recognize Mrs. Souther. The publishers of the Souvenir' have also issued in a neat volume the 'Ingoldsby Legends of Mirth and Marvel,' with engravings by CRUIKSHANK, LEECH, etc. A very entertaining book.

FREDERIKA BREMER'S NOVELS.— The BROTHERS HARPER have published in one large volume “The Neighbors,'«The Home,' «The President's Daughter,' Nina,' “Sketches of Every-Day Life,' “The H — Family,' etc. This handsome volume will be cordially welcomed, not only on account of the attractive works which are collected between its covers, but because it contains a faithful and admirably engraved likeness of Miss BREMER. This popular lady-author has a charming expression of face. Indeed the countenance strongly indicates the very attributes of character which her writings have led us to suppose she must needs possess.

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528

Art. I. QUARLES' DIVINE FANCIES. BY H. C. LEA, Esq., .

497 II. ANNIE GRAY: A CHRISTMAS CHIME. By MR. T. B. READ, ARTIST,

504 III. RECOLLECTIONS OF THE NAVY-ISLAND WAR, IV. SEMBLANCES: A SONG. BY ALICIA JANE SPARROW, or IRELAND,

518 V. TO MARY OF KENTUCKY. By Mas. Mary E. HEWITT,

519 VI. REMINISCENCES OF A DARTMOOR PRISONER. CONCLUDED,

519 VII. LINES TO A FAIR CANTATRICE, .

524 VIII. STANZAS: FAME. By Miss E. R. G. HAZZARD,

525 IX. PASSAGES FROM THE RUSSIAN OF KARAMSIN. BY A. C. BECKER, ESQ.,

1. THE COUNTRY. 2. FANTASIE. 3. DESTINY. 4, THE BIRD OF PARADISE, 525 X. THE MAID OF CASTILE. BY A New CONTRIBUTOR, XI. GOSSIP OF A PLAYER. BY THE LATE WILLIAM ABBo

531 XII. STANZAS TO PEACE. BY SUSAN PINDAR,

539 XIII. MARGUERITE. BY HANS VON SPEIGEL,

540 XIV. MY UNCLE, THE PARSON. BY JOHN WATERS,

541 XV. DEATH-BED OF GENIUS. By Miss H. J. WOODMAN, XVI. LETTERS FROM CUBA. NUMBER Two,

545 XVII. THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER AND THE CHURCH, BY JOHN RHEYN,

552 XVIII. A NIGHT OF TERROR: A SCENE FROM AN UNPUBLISHED NOVEL, 554 XIX. THE GROOMSMAN TO HIS MISTRESS. BY T. W. PARSONS, Esq., .

560 XX. LINES ON THE LOSS OF CARDIFF CHURCH. BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH, 561 XXI. THE MASKED BALL. By Ned BUNTLINE,

561 XXII. THE BURIAL OF CHATTERTON. BY JOHN Ross Dix, Esq.,

567

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LITERARY NOTICES:

1. DRAPER'S TREATISE ON VEGETABLE CHEMISTRY,
2. LIFE OF FRANCIS MARION. BY W. GILMORE SIMMS, .
3. AFLOAT AND ASHORE. BY J. FENIMORE COOPER, ESQ.,
4. ANASTASIS, OR THE DOCTRINE OF THE RESURRECTION.

568 570

. 571

572

. 578

EDITOR'S TABLE:
1. LAW AND LAWYERS: LEGAL LANGUAGE,

574
2. GOSSIP WITH READERS AND CORRESPONDENTS,
1. “'LECTION AND THE COUNTRY : OUR New VOLUME. 2. PARK BENJAMIN'S 'IN-

FATUATION.' 3. THE DRAMA IN THE METROPOLIS. 4. THE LETTER, OR THE TWO BIRTH-DAYS.' 5. THE CALLING OF THE SEA. 6. THE WESTERN LITERARY JOURNAL AND MONTHLY REVIEW.' 7. MEMORIAL OF THE ANCIENT Suu.' 8. THE PRISONER'S ALBUM AT DARTMOOR. 9. SUMMARY JUSTICE: A DEACON DONE FOR.' 10. INMAN'S PORTRAIT OF WORDSWORTH. 11. Hoyr's .CHAUNT OF LIFE: Snow CHANGES. 12. EXCULPATORY: OUR SHELBYVILLE CORRESPONDENT. 13. RAILROAD TO THE HOLY LAND. 14 A GHOST-STORY: EX AN EYE-AND-EAR WITNESS. 15. JUSTICE SHALLOW ON MATCHES AT WATERING PLACES: MATRIMONY IN CHINA. 16. Mr. CLOVER, THE ARTIST. 17. PRAYERS OF THE ENGLISH CHURCH. 18. SITTING FOR A PORTRAIT :' ANECDOTE OF JARVIS, THE PAINTER. 19. TENNYSON AND MOTHERWELL. 20. CHILDREN'S BOOKS FOR THE HOLIDAYS. 21. A FACT IN PHiLOSOPHY: TRISH NATIVE AMERICANISM: JUVENILE POLITICIANS. 22. THE CHRISTIAN PARLOR MAGAZINE.' 23. THE NATURAL AND THE SPIRITUAL Body. 24. THE • NEW WORLD' WEEKLY JOURNAL. 25. PERTINENT PASSAGES FROM Punch.' 20. MNEMOTECHNY : PROF. GOURAUD. 27. ARTICLES FILED. OR AWAITING DECISION. 28. OLD KNICK'S ABSENT MAGNATES. 29. THE CREDIT SYSTEM.'

LITERARY RECORD :

BOYD'S AND CAMPBELL'S RHETORIC; MESSRS. CAREY AND DART's PEERLESS PRE

SENTS FOR THE HOLIDAYS; GRISWOLD's . POETS AND POETRY OF ENGLAND;' THE
ROSE OF SHARON; Cadell's ABBOTSFORD EDITION OF THE WAVERLY Novels;
Mrs. HEMANS' COMPLETE WORKS,

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In a ramble through an old library, we lately came across a little volume of · Divine Fancies' by FRANCIS QUARLES. He is an author who has fallen into undeserved disrepute. Living in an age of vitiated taste, he but followed the example set him by his contemporaries, as to the peculiar style of writing in which he indulged ; and we are at a loss to understand why he should have been so completely neglected by subsequent writers, especially at the present day, when so much care and labor are bestowed on the editing of all the authors of olden time. His name is now almost forgotten, and although much that is worthless has perished with him, yet there are undoubtedly many gems to be found among his productions, which deserve a more fortunate fate. This little book also possesses interest as being an excellent specimen of the style prevalent in those days, when the extravagance of the Elizabethan Euphuism had moderated, and James the First had made it fashionable to mistake pedantry for wit. We confess that we are no great admirer of the poets of that age, with the exception of Milton. Cowley is forced and unnatural, and Donne mistakes ingenuity and harshness for wit and vigor. Sir John Suckling was a poet well worth them all; and while we deplore his license, and regret his carelessness, we feel that had he lived in more propitious times, when wit was restrained by decorum, and rival bards rendered exertion necessary, he would have achieved an enviable name in English literature. His date was, however, rather subsequent to the one which now occupies us, and nature was then beginning to escape from the trammels im. posed upon her by preceding writers.

Quarles was a person of some consideration in his day. Attached to the court of the unfortunate Queen of Bohemia, and then following

**DIVINE FANCIES; digested into Epigrams, Meditations, and Observations. By FRA. QUARLES. London : Printed by G. D. for RICHARD MARRIOT, and are to be sold by WILLIAM SHEARES, at the sign of the Bible, in St. Paul's Churchyard : 1652.' VOL. XXIV.

64

Archbishop Usher to Ireland, he was a witness and a partaker of those extraordinary vicissitudes which, no doubt by teaching him the uncertainty of earthly affairs, gave to his writings the religious spirit with which they are imbued.

His little book of Divine Fancies' is dedicated. To the Royall Bud of Maiestie, and Center of all our Hopes and Happinesse, CHARLES, Prince of Great Brittain, France and Ireland,' etc.; and it is amusing to observe our author's wishes and prophecies in regard to the future licentious debauchee, and shameless stipendiary of France :' • Heaven blesse thy Youth with Grace, and crown thy Age with Glory : Angels conduct thee from the Cradle to the Crown. Let the eminent qualities of both thy renowned Grandfathers meet in thy princely heart, that thou mayst in Peace be honourable and in War victorious. And let the great addition of thy Royall Parents Vertues make thee up a most incomparable Prince, the firm Pillar of our Happiness and the future object of the World's Wonder.' The same strain may be found in the Epistle Recommendatory to the Countess of Dorset, governess of the Prince. As an excellent specimen of the style of that period, we quote part of it:

• You are the Starre which stands over the place where the Babe lies; by whose directious light, I am come from the East to present my Myrrh and Frankincense to the Young Child: Let not our Royall Joseph nor his princely Mary bee afraid; There are no Herods here; Wee have all seen his Star in the East, and have rejoyced. Our loyall hearts are full, for our eyes have seen him in whom our Posterity shall be blessed. Madam, may your Honours increase with your howres, and let eternall Glory crown your Vertues; that when this Age shall sleep in Dust, our Children, yet unborn, may honor your Glorious memory under the happiness of his Government whose Governess you are.'

Notwithstanding the many faults of language and examples of vitiated taste which we find in the writers of that period, there was a fullness of thought in most of them, which we should find it difficult to parallel among those of the present day. There were then none of * the mob of gentlemen who wrote with ease.' They never took up the pen unless they really had thoughts to express, and their chief aim was not expansion, but compression. The consequence is, that what they wrote was worthy of reading, and frequently of studying; and though many of their thoughts and conceits are strained and far-fetched, yet we meet so much good, that we are willing to overlook the “pulchro in corpore nævos.'

There is much ingenuity and some truthfulness in the following distichs :

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