"A Certain Text": Close Readings and Textual Studies on Shakespeare and Others in Honor of Thomas Clayton

Forsideomslag
University of Delaware Press, 2002 - 205 sider
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This collection takes its title from 'Romeo and Juliet' (4.1.21.) when, meeting Paris in Friar Lawrence's cell, Juliet muses, What must be shall be, and the Friar completes her line with, That's a certain text. Where text means a received truth both Friar Lawrence and Clayton are interested skeptics. This essays gathered here reflect this attitude, questioning received ideas about the activities to which Clayton has devoted his professional life- literary editing and the close reading of literary works.

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Indhold

Acknowledgments
7
Introduction
11
Some Early Reprints of Mucedorus
18
The Dram of Eale
29
Some Notes on the Endless Editing of Richard III
50
Stage Directions and Stage Presences in The Merry Wives of Windsor Q1
65
The Physics of Hamlets Rogue and Peasant Slave Speech
75
The Induction as Clue in The Taming of the Shrew
94
A Shakespearean Compass
107
Hesperides the Hebrew Bible and Herricks Christian Identity
122
Ben Jonsons Horace
150
A Cobweb of Dwarves and Dweebs An Exercise in Very Close Reading and Germanic Etymology
173
Contributors
193
Tom Clayton A Checklist
195
Index
200
Copyright

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Populære passager

Side 61 - Give me another horse, — bind up my wounds, — Have mercy, Jesu ! — Soft ; I did but dream. — 0 coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me ! — The lights burn blue. — It is now dead midnight. Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh. What do I fear ? myself? there's none else by : Richard loves Richard ; that is, I am I.
Side 130 - PRAISE ye the LORD. Praise ye the LORD -*- from the heavens : praise him in the heights. Praise ye him, all his angels : praise ye him, all his hosts. Praise ye him, sun and moon : praise him, all ye stars of light.
Side 132 - Go thy way, eat thy bread with joy, and drink thy wine with a merry heart; for God now accepteth thy works.
Side 80 - I'll leave you till night: you are welcome to Elsinore. Ros. Good my lord ! [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Ham. Ay, so, God be wi' you : — Now I am alone. O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I ! Is it not monstrous, that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit...
Side 132 - For the living know that they shall die : but the dead know not any thing, neither have they any more a reward ; for the memory of them is forgotten.
Side 130 - My beloved spake, and said unto me, Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone; The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land; The fig-tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
Side 79 - Who calls me villain? breaks my pate across? Plucks off my beard and blows it in my face? Tweaks me by the nose? gives me the lie i' the throat, As deep as to the lungs?
Side 131 - And as a vapour or a drop of rain Once lost, can ne'er be found again; So when or you or I are made A fable, song, or fleeting shade, All love, all liking, all delight Lies drowned with us in endless night.
Side 79 - What's Hecuba to him or he to Hecuba That he should weep for her? What would he do Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have? He would drown the stage with tears, And cleave the general ear with horrid speech, Make mad the guilty and appal the free, Confound the ignorant, and amaze indeed The very faculties of eyes and ears.
Side 82 - I have heard That guilty creatures, sitting at a play, Have by the very cunning of the scene Been struck so to the soul that presently They have proclaim'd their malefactions; For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak With most miraculous organ.

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