Introductio Ad Prudentiam: Or, Directions, Counsels, and Cautions, Tending to Prudent Management of Affairs in Common Life

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W. Innys, 1731 - 217 sider
 

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Side 231 - ... his reputation all at once, and ventured it at one throw : but if he be to continue in the world, and would have the advantage of...
Side 229 - ... of which the crafty man is always in danger; and when he thinks he walks in the dark, all his pretences are so transparent that he that runs may read them...
Side 228 - Particularly as to the affairs of this world, integrity hath many advantages over all the fine and artificial ways of dissimulation and deceit ; it is much the plainer and easier, much the safer and more secure way of dealing in the world : it has less of trouble and difficulty, of entanglement and perplexity, of danger and hazard in it...
Side 229 - Truth is always consistent with itself, and needs nothing to help it out; it is always near at hand, and sits upon our lips, and is ready to drop out before we are aware; whereas a lie is troublesome, and sets a man's invention upon the rack, and one trick needs a great many more to make it good.
Side 227 - Besides, that it is many times as troublesome to make good the pretence of a good quality, as to have it ; and if a man have it not, it is ten to one but he is discovered to want it, and then all his pains and labour to seem to have it are lost.
Side 228 - It is hard to personate and act a part long ; for where truth is not at the bottom, Nature will always be endeavouring to return, and will peep out and betray herself one time or other.
Side 228 - ... way to our end, carrying us thither in a straight line, and will hold out and last longest. The arts of deceit and cunning...
Side 229 - Whereas he that acts sincerely hath the easiest task in the world ; because he follows nature, and so is put to no trouble and care about his words and actions ; he needs not invent any pretences beforehand, nor make excuses afterwards, for anything he hath said or done. But insincerity is very troublesome to manage ; a hypocrite hath so many things to attend to, as make his life a very perplexed and intricate thing.
Side 213 - The Christian Institutes; or, the Sincere Word of • God. Being a plain and impartial Account of the whole Faith and Duty of a Christian. Collected out of the Writings of the Old and New Testament: digested under proper Heads, and delivered in the Words of Scripture.
Side 215 - Introductio ad Prudentiam; or, Directions, Counsels, and Cautions tending to prudent Management of Affairs in Common Life.

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