The Lancet, Bind 1;Bind 96

Forsideomslag
J. Onwhyn, 1869

Fra bogen

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 286 - MAIDEN! with the meek, brown eyes, In whose orbs a shadow lies Like the dusk in evening skies ! Thou whose locks outshine the sun, Golden tresses, wreathed in one, As the braided streamlets run! Standing, with reluctant feet, Where the brook and river meet, Womanhood and childhood fleet! Gazing, with a timid glance, On the brooklet's swift advance, On the river's broad expanse ! Deep and still...
Side 228 - The CLIMATE of the SOUTH of FRANCE as SUITED to INVALIDS; with Notices of Mediterranean and other Winter Stations. By CT WILLIAMS, MAMD Oxon.
Side 102 - ... or by nitrate of potash, and they observe : " It appears to us that there is not sufficient evidence to prove that any of the advocated systems of treatment have power to prevent the heart becoming diseased. In concluding that the treatment has prevented the heart becoming diseased...
Side 75 - It healed up after the ordinary fashion and in about the ordinary time. But, indeed, you may see cases of this description on a much larger scale if you watch the carbuncles that come to us in the out-patients' room. There we often see them of considerable size, and they do as well among the out-patients as among the in-patients; and yet these out-patients are freely in the air all day, and many of them continue at their work. So you may set it down as one point to be attended to in the management...
Side 63 - France by a mixture of apples and flour, in the proportion of one of the former to two of the latter. The...
Side 74 - If you ask why one may not cut a carbuncle though it may do no good, I reply that you should never be actively useless, and that there are some cases in which the cutting does considerable harm. Carbuncles, for the most part, occur in persons broken down in health, exhausted by overwork, or by bad food, or in...
Side 74 - He led his ordinary abstemious life, took moderate quantities of food and stimulant, lived through a carbuncle of the greatest severity, and finally made a complete recovery, and lived for several years after. Another case which impressed me very much was that of a friend of my own in the profession, who had a carbuncle on the back of his neck, of very considerable size. Sir Benjamin Brodie and Mr. Stanley attended him with me, and under their advice the carbuncle was cut. I watched its course afterwards,...
Side 74 - ... considerable harm. Carbuncles, for the most part, occur in persons broken down in health, exhausted by overwork, or by bad food, or in general deteriorated health — as sometimes in diabetes or albuminuria ; and in all these states it is a good general rule to save the blood they need for healing. The loss of blood from the carbuncle' itself would not be considerable ; the hard substance of the carbunclo, when cut into, does not bleed, or bleeds but little.
Side 102 - Drs. Gull and Sutton next proceed to inquire what evidence there is to show that the drug treatment prevents the heart becoming diseased, and they give a detailed account of the state of the heart in their twenty-five cases.
Side 43 - ... most esteemed. The power of this drug over inflammation is little less than marvellous. It can sometimes at once cut short the inflammation. It does not remove the products of inflammation when these are formed, but by controlling the disease, it prevents the formation of these, and so saves the tissues from further injury. It is therefore in the early stage of inflammation that the good effects of this plant are most conspicuous ; still, although the disease may have progressed to some extent,...

Bibliografiske oplysninger