Fraser's Magazine, Bind 77

Forsideomslag
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1868
 

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Populære passager

Side 500 - The Sun's rim dips; the stars rush out: At one stride comes the dark; With far-heard whisper, o'er the sea, Off shot the spectre-bark.
Side 687 - Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees ; Lives through all life, extends through all extent, Spreads undivided, operates unspent...
Side 673 - When I mention religion, I mean the Christian religion ; and not only the Christian religion, but the Protestant religion ; and not only the Protestant religion, but the Church of England.
Side 371 - The One remains, the many change and pass ; Heaven's light forever shines, Earth's shadows fly; Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass, Stains the white radiance of Eternity, Until Death tramples it to fragments.
Side 255 - I, even I, am he that comforteth you: Who art thou, that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die, And of the son of man which shall be made as grass; And forgettest the Lord thy maker, That hath stretched forth the heavens, and laid the foundations of the earth...
Side 608 - ... if I had not been a piece of a logician before I came to him, I think he would have persuaded me to have wished myself a horse.
Side 213 - UPON A CHILD. • HERE a pretty baby lies Sung asleep with lullabies ; Pray be silent, and not stirre Th
Side 278 - For it is a principle of universal law, that the natural-born subject of one prince cannot by any act of his own, no, not by swearing allegiance to another, put off or discharge his natural allegiance to the former : for this natural allegiance was intrinsic, and primitive, and antecedent to the other; and cannot be devested without the concurrent act of that prince to whom it was first due.
Side 600 - Let your first action be the lifting up of your mind to Almighty God by hearty prayer; and feelingly digest the words you speak in prayer, with continual meditation and thinking of him to whom you pray, and of the matter for which you pray.
Side 679 - Men have lost their reason in nothing so much as their religion, wherein stones and clouts make martyrs; and, since the religion of one seems madness unto another, to afford an account or rational of old rites requires no rigid reader.

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