Readings from Huxley

Forsideomslag
Harcourt, Brace and Howe, 1920 - 160 sider
 

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Side 130 - In other words, education is the instruction of the intellect in the laws of Nature, under which name I include not merely things and their forces, but men and their ways; and the fashioning of the affections and of the will into an earnest and loving desire to move in harmony with those laws.
Side 31 - We live in a world which is full of misery and ignorance ; and the plain duty of each and all of us is to try to make the little corner he can influence somewhat less miserable and somewhat less ignorant than it was before he entered it.
Side 24 - ... return, while if he offered him a fruit he would please him, and perhaps receive a fish in exchange. When men had acquired this much knowledge, the outlines, rude though they were, of mathematics, of physics, of chemistry, of biology, of moral, economical, and political science, were sketched. Nor did the germ of religion fail when science began to bud. Listen to words which, though new, are yet three thousand years old: — ". . . . When in heaven the stars about the moon Look beautiful, when...
Side 130 - ... never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance. To the man who plays well, the highest stakes are paid, with that sort of overflowing generosity with which the strong shows delight in strength. And one who plays ill is checkmated — without haste, but without remorse.
Side 15 - Our business was (precluding matters of Theology and state affairs) to discourse and consider of Philosophical Enquiries, and such as related thereunto : as physick, anatomy, geometry, astronomy, navigation, staticks, magneticks, chymicks, mechanicks, and natural experiments ; with the state of these studies, as then cultivated at home and abroad.
Side 62 - Yet all this availeth me nothing, so long as I see Mordecai the Jew sitting at the king's gate.
Side 114 - The first, that a criticism of life is the essence of culture; the second, that literature contains the materials which suffice for the construction of such criticism. I think that we must all assent to the first proposition. For culture certainly means something quite different from learning or technical skill. It implies the possession of an ideal, and the habit of critically estimating the value of things by comparison with a theoretic standard. Perfect...
Side 119 - Or we come to propositions of such reach and magnitude as those which Professor Huxley delivers, when he says that the notions of our forefathers about the beginning and the end of the world were all wrong, and that nature is the expression of a definite order with which nothing interferes.
Side 35 - But anyone who is practically acquainted with scientific work is aware that those who refuse to go beyond fact rarely get as far as fact, and anyone who has studied the history of science knows that almost every great step therein has been made by the "anticipation of nature...
Side 129 - Yet, it is a very plain and elementary truth that the life, the fortune, and the happiness of every one of us...

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