Mackinac: Formerly Michilimackinac

Forsideomslag
D. D. Thorp & son, 1895 - 226 sider
 

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Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 51 - THE groves were God's first temples. Ere man learned To hew the shaft, and lay the architrave. And spread the roof above them, — ere he framed The lofty vault, to gather and roll back The sound of anthems ; in the darkling wood, Amidst the cool and silence, he knelt down, And offered to the Mightiest solemn thanks And supplication.
Side 6 - Ye say they all have passed away, That noble race and brave ; That their light canoes have vanished, From off the crested wave. That 'mid the forests where they roamed, There rings no hunter's shout ; But their name is on your waters, Ye may not wash it out...
Side 86 - Englishman, it is you that have made war with this our father. You are his enemy; and how, then, could you have the boldness to venture among us, his children? You know that his enemies are ours. " ' Englishman, we are informed that our father, the king of France, is old and infirm ; and that, being fatigued with making war upon your nation, he is fallen asleep.
Side 87 - Your nation supposes that we, like the white people,* can not live without bread and pork and beef. But you ought to know that He, the Great Spirit and Master of Life, has provided food for us upon these broad lakes and in these mountains.
Side 87 - Englishman, your king has never sent us any presents, nor entered into any treaty with us, wherefore he and we are still at war...
Side 87 - Englishman, although you have conquered the French, you have not yet conquered us! We are not your slaves. These lakes, these woods and mountains, were left to us by our ancestors. They are our inheritance, and we will part with them to none. Your nation supposes that we, like the white people, cannot live without bread, and pork, and beef! But you ought to know that He, the Great Spirit and Master of Life, has provided food for us, in these spacious lakes and on these woody mountains.
Side 105 - This was a moment for despair; but the next, a Pani woman, a slave of M. Langlade's, beckoned to me to follow her. She brought me to a door, which she opened, desiring me to enter, and telling me that it led to the garret, where I must go and conceal myself. I Joyfully obeyed her directions, and she, having followed me up to the garret-door, locked it after me, and with great presence of mind took away the key.
Side 136 - We now exchanged farewells with an emotion entirely reciprocal. I did not quit the lodge without the most grateful sense of the many acts of goodness which I had experienced in it, nor without the sincerest respect for the virtues which I had witnessed among its members. All the family accompanied me to the beach ; and the canoe had no sooner put off than Wawatam commenced an address to the Kichi Manito, beseeching him to take care of me, his brother, till we should next meet.
Side 116 - Chippeways, as soon as we were restored to them, marched us to a village of their own, situate on the point which is below the fort, and put us into a lodge, already the prison of fourteen soldiers, tied two and two, with each a rope about his neck, and made fast to a pole which might be called the supporter of the building.
Side 98 - Ducharme, and threatened to send the next person who should bring a story of the same kind a prisoner to Detroit. "The garrison at this time consisted of ninety privates, two subalterns, and the commandant, and the English merchants at the fort were four in number.

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