Ballads and Sonnets

Forsideomslag
Ellis and White, 1882 - 337 sider
 

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Side 117 - Of its own arduous fulness reverent: Carve it in ivory or in ebony, As Day or Night may rule ; and let Time see Its flowering crest impearled and orient.
Side 215 - A SUPERSCRIPTION. • LOOK in my face ; my name is Might-have-been ; I am also called No-more, Too-late, Farewell ; Unto thine ear I hold the dead-sea shell Cast up thy Life's foam-fretted feet between ; Unto thine eyes the glass where that is seen Which had Life's form and Love's, but by my spell Is now a shaken shadow intolerable, Of ultimate things unuttered the frail screen. Mark me, how still I am ! But should there dart One moment through...
Side 69 - Full many a lordly hour, full fain Of his realm's rule and pride of his reign : — But this King never smiled again. By none but me can the tale be told, The butcher of Rouen, poor Berold. (Lands are swayed by a King on a throne.) 'Twas a royal train put forth to sea. Yet the tale can be told by none but me. (The sea hath no King but God alone.) THE KING'S TRAGEDY JAMES I.
Side 61 - By none but me can the tale be told, The butcher of Rouen, poor Berold. (Lands are swayed by a King on a throne.) 'Twas a royal train put forth to sea, Yet the tale can be told by none but me. (The sea hath no King but God alone.) And now the end came o'er the waters' womb Like the last great Day that's yet to come.
Side 255 - Strange to think by the way, Whatever there is to know, That shall we know one day.
Side 191 - How should this be ? Art thou then so much more Than they who sowed, that thou shouldst reap thereby? Nay, come up hither. From this wave-washed mound Unto the furthest flood-brim look with me ; Then reach on with thy thought till it be drown'd. Miles and miles distant though the last line be, And though thy soul sail leagues and leagues beyond, — Still, leagues beyond those leagues, there is more sea.
Side 139 - Her tremulous smiles ; her glances' sweet recall Of love ; her murmuring sighs memorial ; Her mouth's culled sweetness by thy kisses shed On cheeks and neck and eyelids, and so led Back to her mouth which answers there for all : — What sweeter than these things, except the thing In lacking which all these would lose their sweet :~The confident heart's still fervor : the swift beat And soft subsidence of the spirit's wing, Then when it feels, in cloud-girt wayfaring, The breath of kindred plumes...
Side 81 - Or was it an eagle bent to the blast? When near we came, we knew it at last For a woman tattered and old. But it seemed as though by a fire within Her writhen limbs were wrung; And as soon as the King was close to her, She stood up gaunt and strong. Twas then the moon sailed clear of the rack On high in her hollow dome; And still as aloft with hoary crest Each clamorous wave rang home, Like fire in snow the moonlight blazed Amid the champing foam. And the woman held his eyes with her eyes: — 'O...
Side 195 - Hers are the eyes which, over and beneath, The sky and sea bend on thee, — which can draw, By sea or sky or woman, to one law, The allotted bondman of her palm and wreath. This is that Lady Beauty, in whose praise Thy voice and hand shake...
Side 152 - NOT I myself know all my love for thee : How should I reach so far, who cannot weigh To-morrow's dower by gage of yesterday ? Shall birth and death, and all dark names that be As doors and windows bared to some loud sea, Lash deaf mine ears and blind my face with spray ; And shall my sense pierce love, — the last relay And ultimate outpost of eternity ? Lo ! what am I to Love, the lord of all ? One murmuring shell he gathers from the sand, — One little heart-flame sheltered in his hand. Yet through...

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