The Pageant of Greece

Forsideomslag
Clarendon Press, 1924 - 436 sider
 

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Populære passager

Side 8 - I shall do so ; But I must also feel it as a man : I cannot but remember such things were, That were most precious to me.
Side 86 - Who are these coming to the sacrifice? To what green altar, O mysterious priest, Lead'st thou that heifer lowing at the skies, And all her silken flanks with garlands drest?
Side 5 - WEEP with me, all you that read This little story; And know, for whom a tear you shed Death's self is sorry. 'Twas a child that so did thrive In grace and feature As Heaven and Nature seemed to strive Which owned the creature.
Side 282 - Crito, I owe a cock to Asclepius; will you remember to pay the debt? The debt shall be paid, said Crito; is there anything else?
Side 111 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge, And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deafening clamour in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes?
Side 388 - THEY told me, Heraclitus, they told me you were dead ; They brought me bitter news to hear and bitter tears to shed. I wept, as I remembered, how often you and I Had tired the sun with talking and sent him down the sky.
Side 282 - ... and the man who gave him the poison now and then looked at his feet and legs; and after a while he pressed his foot hard and asked him if he could feel; and he said, no; and then his leg, and so upwards and upwards, and showed us that he was cold and stiff. And he felt them himself, and said: When the poison reaches the heart, that will be the end.
Side 354 - From what we have said it will be seen that the poet's function is to describe, not the thing that has happened, but a kind of thing that might happen, ie what is possible as being probable or necessary.
Side 6 - He played so truly. So, by error to his fate They all consented ; But viewing him since, alas, too late They have repented ; And have sought to give new birth In baths to steep him ; But being so much too good for earth, Heaven vows to keep him.
Side 106 - Those, certainly, which most powerfully appeal to the great primary human affections : to those elementary feelings which subsist permanently in the race, and which are independent of time. These feelings are permanent and the same; that which interests them is permanent and the same also. The modernness or antiquity of an action, therefore, has nothing to do with its fitness for poetical representation; this depends upon its inherent qualities.

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