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between Joss' teeth; “take my pail, sir!” Joss took it, shook it, and then dropped it.

8. Robbie put it in Joss' mouth again, and again Joss shook it and dropped it. Robbie tried it three or four times; but the result was just the same, though he frowned at Joss sternly, and cried out in a very cross tone, “Don't you dare to drop it, sir!”

9. The pail began to get a good many dents in it. “It's no use,” said Robbie; “I shall spoil the pail, and Joss will never learn a thing." So he went back to his mother and told her his story.

10. “I know just how you feel, Robbie,” said his mother. “I have been trying to teach a little boy to say, “Yes, mamma,' and 'No, mamma,' for a long time, but still he says, “Yes' and 'No,' instead, nearly all the time."

11. Robbie hung his head; and his mamma went on: “I shall keep on trying, though, and you had better, too. Perhaps we shall both succeed in time. I will get you a new pail for the yeast, and you can keep the dented one on purpose to teach Joss with. You mustn't get tired trying Just think of the years I have been trying to teach my little boy a few simple words."

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12. Robbie said, “Yes, mamma," very carefully, and the next day he went to work at training Joss some more. Before many days, Joss would

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carry the pail nicely. Then Robbie taught him to stand on his hind feet and beg, and to go for the paper, and to do many other tricks. Joss

used to stand on his hind legs, and make a very funny noise which Robbie called singing, though it was really only whining and yelping:

13. Training Joss made Robbie understand better how hard it was for his mother to train him. He made up his mind to help her. Because he liked to have Joss do as he was told, he tried harder to do right himself. So Joss taught his young master a lesson.

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What shall I do with children who can write very well if they try, but who are growing careless ?" said Miss H. one day.

“I think I should have them do over the careless part,” said Fred Pride; "that is what mamma does in things at home.”

“I could not have it all done over; and I should be afraid it would be done no better. I think I will set them making letters and parts

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of letters.

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We will begin with vw t and

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l; then take my and OaV; and on another day NNNW WO?

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castle

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sword | thim'ble | foul | cock'le de moy' |

Cockledemoy,
My boy, my boy!”
“Here, father, here.” —

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Cockledemoy!

My boy, my boy, What wilt thou do that will give thee joy? Wilt thou ride on the midnight owl?” “No; for the weather is stormy and foul.”

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“Cockledemoy!

My boy, my boy, What wilt thou do that can give thee joy ? With a needle for a sword, and a thimble for

a hat, Wilt thou fight a battle with the castle cat?" “Oh, no! she has claws, and I like not that.”

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Cockledemoy!

My boy, my boy,
What shall we do that can give thee joy?
Shall we go seek for a cuckoo's nest ?"
That's best, that's best!”

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SIR W. Scott.

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mead'ow bough (bow) pounce hedge-war'bler an'i mals bal'ance

crunch'es cat'er pil lars 1. The cuckoo is the English bird of spring. It stays only so long as the weather is fine. It comes in the pleasant spring-time when leaves begin to peep from the buds, and when the

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flowers begin to smile in the green meadows. When the cuckoo's voice is heard in the woods, the English children know that the cold days of winter are over and gone.

2. Let us have a good look at that cuckoo, as

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