The Healing Gods of Ancient Civilizations

Forsideomslag
Yale University Press, 1925 - 569 sider
 

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Side 274 - Into whatever houses I enter, I will go into them for the benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; and, further, from the seduction of females or males, of freemen and slaves. Whatever, in connection with my professional practice, or not in connection with it, I see or hear, in the life of men, which ought not to be spoken of abroad, I will not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. While I continue to keep this Oath unviolated,...
Side 274 - I will keep this oath and stipulation - to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my substance with him, and relieve his necessities if required; to look upon his offspring...
Side 390 - The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful.
Side 274 - Art, if they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by precept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the Art to my own sons, and those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my abili ty and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients, and abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous.
Side 391 - Such was the mild spirit of antiquity, that the nations were less attentive to the difference, than to the resemblance, of their religious worship. The Greek, the Roman, and the Barbarian, as they met before their respective altars, easily persuaded themselves, that under various names, and with various ceremonies, they adored the same deities.
Side 391 - The deities of a thousand groves and a thousand streams possessed, in peace, their local and respective influence; nor could the Roman who deprecated the wrath of the Tiber, deride the Egyptian who presented his offering to the beneficent genius of the Nile.
Side 274 - I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be done by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I enter, I will go into them for the benefit of the sick, and will abstain from every voluntary act of mischief and corruption, and, further, from the seduction of females or males, of freemen and slaves.
Side 274 - Oath and this stipulation — to reckon him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share my substance with him, and...
Side 274 - ... wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation, and that by precept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction, I will impart a knowledge of the art to my own sons, and to those of my teachers, and to disciples bound by a stipulation and oath, according to the law of medicine but to none others.
Side 309 - When burning with desire, he deign'd to feed A mortal's coursers on Amphrysus' mead. His herds increas'd, and overspread the ground, Kids leapt, and sportive lambkins frisk'd around, Where'er Apollo bent his favouring...

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