The Atlantic Monthly, Bind 102

Forsideomslag
Atlantic Monthly Co., 1908
 

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Side 587 - So Jonah went out of the city, and sat on the east side of the city, and there made him a booth, and sat under it in the shadow, till he might see what would become of the city.
Side 246 - The greatest delight which the fields and woods minister is the suggestion of an occult relation between man and the vegetable. I am not alone and unacknowledged. They nod to me and I to them.
Side 585 - In the bright lexicon of youth there is no such word as "fail," but the dictionary makes up for this deficiency.
Side 640 - This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a mighty one, the being thoroughly worn out before you are thrown on the scrap heap. The being a force of nature instead of a feverish little clod of ailments and grievances, complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy.
Side 593 - Dare to be a Daniel, Dare to stand alone; Dare to have a purpose firm, Dare to make it known.
Side 245 - ... same case with one who requires to take opium for the same purpose. What we want to see is one who can breast into the world, do a man's work, and still preserve his first and pure enjoyment of existence. Thoreau's faculties were of a piece with his moral shyness; for they were all delicacies. He could guide himself about the woods on the darkest night by the touch of his feet.
Side 322 - What a sanitary element in our affairs The Nation is !" — "To my generation," wrote William James, "Godkin's was certainly the towering influence in all thought concerning public affairs, and indirectly his influence has certainly been more pervasive than that of any other writer of the generation, for he influenced other writers who never quoted him, and determined the whole current of discussion.
Side 577 - He said he was for vesting the executive power in a single person, though he was not for giving him the power of war and peace. A single man would feel the greatest responsibility, and administer the public affairs best. Mr. SHERMAN said, he considered the executive magistracy as nothing more than an institution for carrying the will of the legislature into effect...
Side 262 - Everything that I have written has the closest possible connection with what I have lived through even if it has not been my own personal experience; in every new poem or play I have aimed at my own spiritual emancipation and purification— for a man shares the responsibility and guilt of the society to which he belongs.
Side 325 - He is like one who retires under the shelter of a wall in the storm of dust and sleet, which the driving wind hurries along ; and when he sees the rest of mankind full of wickedness, he is content if only he can live his own life and be pure from evil or unrighteousness, and depart in peace and good-will, with bright hopes.

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