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MORISONIANISM REFUTED:

A

REVIEW

OF THE

REV, JAMES MORISON'S

EXPOSITION OF THE NINTH CHAPTER OF PAUL'S

EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS.

BY THE AUTHOR OF

“ A DEFENCE OF INFANT BAPTISM,” &c.

ALEX. GARDNER, PAISLEY.
OGLE & SON, D. BRYCE, AND G. GALLIE, GLASGOW.
OLIVER & BOYD, AND JOHNSTONE & HUNTER, EDINBURGH.

HOULSTON AND STONEMAN, LONDON.

1852.

10%. d. 238.

1.E

PREFACE,

The Ninth Chapter of Paul's Epistle to the Romans is a very important portion of the word of God. This is acknowledged by all. It has been characterised as the “chapter of chapters.” It has formed the battle-field of many a hard-fought polemico-theological contest. Hence the importance of a sound exegesis of its several parts; and the duty of investigating it in an humble, candid, and prayerful disposition of mind.

The work of the Rev. James Morison,* on this part of Scripture, is dedicated to all “ the Professors of Theology, in the Established and Unestablished Churches in Scotland;" and contains an invitation to them to “come forth, in all the might of their great abilities, and in all the panoply of their extensive acquirements,” to the investigation of the topics discussed in his work. As the writer of the following pages cannot “stand forth” thus panoplied and arrayed, it may seem presumptuous on his part to engage in the discussion; and perhaps it is so. He is far from thinking himself qualified to grapple with this “great argument" in all its breadth, and aspects, and bearings. There are certain respects, however, in which it may be viewed,

* An Exposition of the Ninth Chapter of Paul's Epistle to the Romans. By James Morison. Kilmarnock, 1849.

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in some degree level to the capacities of ordinary minds. His work is not intended for “Professors of Theology." It does not aspire to any thing so exalted. Its aim is much less ambitious. It is meant for the class to which the writer himself belongs, and to all who, like the noble-minded Bereans of old,

“search the Scriptures daily, to see whether those things are so.” It has been composed during the few “ leisure hours” in the evening of the day, which business, and the pressure of other engagements, have permitted him to enjoy. In these circumstances, he has not been able to mature his thoughts in the manner he would have wished; and hence some of the defects and blemishes of the present work. Its faults are probably more numerous than he is aware of.

When the writer perused, for the first time, the work of Mr. Morison, he was very much startled at the nature of some of his conclusions, and at the amount of plausible reasoning, learning, and research, displayed in their defence. This determined him to give it a second and a more careful perusal; and then he was still more startled to discover that it contained an amount of sophistry and unfair statement truly astonishing. That such is the case, he has endeavoured to make good; and he leaves it entirely with the reader to say how far, or whether or not, he has succeeded.

A. G.

PAISLEY, APRIL, 1852.

REVIEW

OF THE

REV. JAMES MORISON'S

EXPOSITION OF THE NINTH CHAPTER OF PAUL'S

EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS.

THIS is an elaborate, and in some respects a learned and able work. The author is undoubtedly entitled to the praise of great industry; though we cannot commend the tone and manner which he frequently assumes. As it is our wish to deal with the book itself, however, and not with its author, we shall pass over, without farther notice, this and some other matters on which we might have ani. madverted.

The task which the author has undertaken, namely, to reconcile the ninth chapter of Paul's epistle to the Romans, with the dogmas of Arminianism,-is a hard and difficult one; and it will not excite much surprise though he has failed. This is not the fault of the author; for he has left no stone unturned that was likely to aid him in his enterprise. He seems to have exhausted, thoroughly and com

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