The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth: With a Memoir, Bind 6

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Side 160 - I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell ; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul Listened intensely ; and his countenance soon Brightened with joy ; for murmurings from within Were heard, sonorous cadences ! whereby, To his belief, the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea. Even such a shell the universe itself Is to the ear of Faith...
Side 6 - All strength — all terror, single or in bands, That ever was put forth in personal form — Jehovah — with his thunder, and the choir Of shouting Angels, and the empyreal thrones — I pass them unalanned.
Side 121 - The darts of anguish fix not where the seat Of suffering hath been thoroughly fortified By acquiescence in the Will supreme For time and for eternity ; by faith, Faith absolute in God, including hope, And the defence that lies in boundless love Of his perfections ; with habitual dread Of aught unworthily conceived, endured Impatiently, ill-done, or left undone, To the dishonour of his holy name.
Side 28 - More tranquil, yet perhaps of kindred birth, That steal upon the meditative mind, And grow with thought. Beside yon spring I stood And eyed its waters, till we seemed to feel One sadness, they and I. For them a bond Of brotherhood is broken : time has been When every day the touch of human hand Dislodged the natural sleep that binds them up In mortal stillness; and they ministered To human comfort.
Side 327 - The primal duties shine aloft — like stars ; The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, Are scattered at the feet of man — like flowers.
Side 354 - Of troublous and distressed mortality, That thus make way unto the ugly birth Of their own sorrows, and do still beget Affliction upon Imbecility: Yet seeing thus the course of things must run, He looks thereon not strange, but as fore-done. "And whilst distraught ambition compasses, And is encompassed, while as craft deceives, And is deceived : whilst man doth ransack man, And builds on blood, and rises by distress ; And th...
Side 42 - Made many a fond enquiry ; and when they, Whose presence gave no comfort, were gone by, Her heart was still more sad. And by yon gate, That bars the traveller's road, she often stood, And when a stranger horseman came, the latch Would lift, and in his face look wistfully : Most happy, if, from aught discovered there Of tender feeling, she might dare repeat The same sad question.
Side 28 - Hath blessed poor Margaret for her gentle looks, When she upheld the cool refreshment drawn From that forsaken spring ; and no one came But he was welcome ; no one went away But that it seemed she loved him. She is dead, The light extinguished of her lonely hut, The hut itself abandoned to decay, And she forgotten in the quiet grave. I speak," continued he, "of One whose stock Of virtues bloomed beneath this lonely roof.
Side 164 - Chained to its object in brute slavery; But taught with patient interest to watch The processes of things, and serve the cause Of order and distinctness...
Side 17 - Profuse in garniture of wooden cuts Strange and uncouth ; dire faces, figures dire, Sharp-knee'd, sharp-elbowed, and lean-ankled too, With long and ghostly shanks — forms which once seen Could never be forgotten...

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