Mental Culture; Or, The Means of Developing the Human Faculties

Forsideomslag
Allen, 1834 - 264 sider
 

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Side 55 - An active Principle : — howe'er removed From sense and observation, it subsists In all things, in all natures; in the stars Of azure heaven, the unenduring clouds, In flower and tree, in every pebbly stone That paves the brooks, the stationary rocks, The moving waters, and the invisible air.
Side 211 - ... what that was ; he accordingly pronounced aloud the name of the king, upon which Finow snatched the paper from his hand, and with astonishment, looked at it, turned it round and examined it in all directions; at length he exclaimed, "This is neither like myself nor anybody else ; where are my eyes ? where is my head ? where are my legs? How can you possibly know it to be I ?" and then without stopping for any attempt at an explanation, he impatiently ordered Mr.
Side 210 - This mode of communicating sentiments was an inexplicable puzzle to Finow. He took the letter again and examined it, but it afforded him no information. He considered the matter a little within himself, but his thoughts reflected no light upon the subject. At length he sent for Mr. Mariner, and desired him to write down something. 5. The latter asked what he would choose to have written. He replied, put down me. He accordingly wrote ".Fee-now;" (spelling it according to the strict English orthography).
Side 61 - Strikes on the quick observer: whether pomp, Or praise, or beauty, mix their partial claim Where sordid fashions, where ignoble deeds, Where foul deformity, are wont to dwell ; Or whether these with violation...
Side 210 - This mode of communicating sentiment was an inexplicable puzzle to Finow ; he took the letter again, and examined it, but it afforded him no information. He thought a little within himself, but his thoughts reflected no light upon the subject. At length he sent for Mr. Mariner and desired him to write down something : the latter asked what he would choose to have written? he replied "put down me...
Side 60 - These grateful stings of laughter, from disgust Educing pleasure ? Wherefore, but to aid . The tardy steps of Reason, and at once By this prompt impulse urge us to depress The giddy aims of Folly ? Though the light Of Truth slow dawning on the inquiring mind At length unfolds, through...
Side 126 - The true principles of the brotherhood of man are the fundamental principles of the order — ,Do unto others as you would they should do unto you,
Side 53 - HEMANS, is no more. She died on the night of Saturday, the 16th of May 1835, at Dublin, and met her fate with all the calm resignation of a Christian, conscious that her spirit was winging its flight to another and a better world, where ' the wicked cease from troubling, and the weary are at rest.
Side 213 - ... acquiring a thorough knowledge of it. The use of metaphor, which may be said to be the algebra of language, is, I apprehend, unknown amongst them. And as language, after all, is made up only of the signs and counters of knowledge, he that is obliged to lose so much time in acquiring the sign, will have but little of the thing. So complete is the ignorance of this conceited nation, on many points, that very curious brass models of all the mechanical powers, which the French Government had sent...
Side 123 - Princes, like beauties, from their youth Are strangers to the voice of truth ; Learn to contemn all praise betimes ; For flattery is the nurse of crimes...

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