The Complete Angler, Or, Contemplative Mans Recreation: Being a Discourse on Rivers, Fish-ponds, Fish, and Fishing

Forsideomslag
L.A. Lewis, 1839 - 396 sider

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Side 84 - SWEET Day, so cool, so calm, so bright, The bridal of the earth and sky, The dew shall weep thy fall to-night ; For thou must die. Sweet Rose, whose hue angry and brave Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye, Thy root is ever in its grave, And thou must die. Sweet Spring, full of sweet days and roses, A box where sweets compacted lie, My Music shows ye have your closes, And all must die.
Side 54 - Fair lined slippers for the cold, With buckles of the purest gold. A belt of straw and ivy buds With coral clasps and amber studs : And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my love.
Side 8 - Lord, what music hast thou provided for the saints in heaven, when thou affordest bad men such music on earth...
Side 50 - ... which broke their waves, and turned them into foam : and sometimes I beguiled time by viewing the harmless lambs, some leaping securely in the cool shade, whilst others sported themselves in the cheerful sun ; and saw others craving comfort from the swollen udders of their bleating dams. As I thus sat, these and other sights had so fully possessed my soul with content, that I thought, as the poet has happily expressed it, " I was for that time lifted above earth, And possessed joys not promised...
Side xxix - Who God doth late and early pray More of his grace than gifts to lend ; And entertains the harmless day With a...
Side 208 - The diligent hand ma'keth rich ;" and it is true indeed : but he considers not that it is not in the power of riches to make a man happy ; for it was wisely said, by a man of great observation, " That there be as many miseries beyond riches as on this side them.
Side 180 - Calls my fleeting soul away : 0 suppress that magic sound, 'Which destroys without a wound ! Peace, Chloris, peace, or singing die, That together you and I To heaven may go ; For all we know Of what the blessed do above Is — that they sing, and that they love.
Side 54 - Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten; In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move, To come to thee and be thy love.
Side 23 - Nature seem'd in love ; The lusty sap began to move ; Fresh juice did stir th' embracing vines ; And birds had drawn their valentines. The jealous trout, that low did lie, Rose at a well-dissembled fly ; There stood my Friend, with patient skill, Attending of his trembling quill.
Side 91 - I IN these flowery meads would be : These crystal streams should solace me; To whose harmonious bubbling noise I with my angle would rejoice, Sit here, and see the turtle-dove Court his chaste mate to acts of love; Or on that bank, feel the west wind Breathe health and plenty; please my mind, To see sweet dewdrops kiss these flowers, And then...

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