The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Cæsar, to the Revolution in 1688, Bind 9

Forsideomslag
Stereotyped and printed by and for A. Wilson, Duke Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, 1810
 

Hvad folk siger - Skriv en anmeldelse

Vi har ikke fundet nogen anmeldelser de normale steder.

Udvalgte sider

Indhold

Andre udgaver - Se alle

Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 415 - One of the greatest blessings we enjoy, one of the greatest blessings a people can enjoy, is liberty ; but every good in this life has its alloy of evil. Licentiousness is the alloy of liberty ; it is an ebullition, an excrescence ; it is a speck upon the eye of the political body, which I can never touch but with a gentle, with a trembling hand, lest I destroy the body, lest I injure the eye upon which it is apt to appear.
Side 452 - Much more, Sir, is he to be abhorred, who, as he has advanced in age, has receded from virtue, and becomes more wicked with less temptation ; — who prostitutes himself for money which he cannot enjoy, and spends the remains of his life in the ruin of his country.
Side 192 - ... who have power to execute it, to pursue me to the scaffold. My blood was to have been the cement of a new alliance, nor could my innocence be any security, after...
Side 240 - ... seemed rather to be calculated for the meridian of Germany than Great Britain, and that the king was a stranger to our language and constitution.
Side 182 - Hanover the intimation of his majesty's accession, and attend him in his journey to England. They sent the general officers in whom they could confide to their respective posts : they reinforced the garrison of Portsmouth : they appointed Mr.
Side 264 - Britain would be drained of its gold and silver; that the artificial and prodigious rise of the South Sea stock was a dangerous bait, which might decoy many unwary people to their ruin, alluring them by a false prospect of gain to part with the fruits of their industry, to purchase imaginary riches...
Side 38 - I present to your majesty a letter, not from the chancery, but from the heart of the queen my mistress, and written with her own hand. Had not her sex prevented...
Side 451 - Parliament for the encouragement and increase of seamen, and for the better and speedier manning of her Majesty's fleet...
Side 117 - Philip's being expelled from the throne of Spain by the arms of his own grandfather. She now perceived that the exorbitant power of the house of Austria would...
Side 277 - Upon this article the company's loss exceeded six millions nine hundred thousand pounds; for many debtors refused to make any payment. The proprietors of the stock loudly complained of their being deprived of two millions ; and the Parliament in the sequel revived that sum which had been annihilated. While this affair was in agitation, petitions from counties, cities, and boroughs, in all parts of the kingdom, were presented to the House, crying for justice against the villany of the directors. Pamphlets...

Bibliografiske oplysninger