Wittgenstein on Freud and Frazer

Forsideomslag
Cambridge University Press, 13. jul. 1998 - 310 sider
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What is it that troubles and preoccupies us about the anxieties and anguishes of social and private life? Have advances in the disciplines of psychoanalysis, psychology or the social sciences in general ministered to our needs in these areas? In this forcefully argued collection of essays, Frank Cioffi examines Wittgenstein's reflections on the comparative claims of clarification and empirical enquiry. Though writing out of admiration and indebtedness, he expresses reservations as to the limits Wittgenstein places on the relevance and desirability of empirical knowledge. His discusssions extend from Wittgenstein's reflections on human sacrifice and other ritual practices dealt with by Frazer to Freud's account of the sources of anxiety, depression, dreams and laughter. He asks both whether it is empirical investigation or more lucid reflection that these phenomena demand, and what kind of question this itself is.
 

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Indhold

Information contemplation and social life
19
Aesthetic explanation and aesthetic perplexity
47
Wittgenstein and the Firefestivals
80
When do empirical methods bypass the problems which trouble us?
107
Explanation selfclarification and solace
128
Wittgenstein on making homeopathic magic clear
155
Wittgenstein and obscurantism
183
Wittgenstein on Freuds abominable mess
206
Congenital transcendentalism and the loneliness which is the truth about things
235
AFTERWORD
253
Explanation and selfclarification in Frazer
255
Explanation and selfclarification in Freud
264
Conclusion two cheers for the coroners report
301
Index
305
Copyright

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