The White Mountain Guide Book

Forsideomslag
E. C. Eastman, 1864 - 240 sider
 

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Side 142 - And winds with short turns down the precipice. And in its depth there is a mighty rock, Which has, from unimaginable years, Sustained itself with terror and with toil Over a gulf, and with the agony With which it clings seems slowly coming down ;— Even as a wretched soul hour after hour Clings to the mass of life ; yet, clinging, leans ; And, leaning, makes more dark the dread abyss In which it fears to fall. Beneath this crag, Huge as despair, as if in weariness The melancholy mountain yawns....
Side 134 - Come up like ocean murmurs. But the scene Is lovely round ; a beautiful river there Wanders amid the fresh and fertile meads, The paradise he made unto himself, Mining the soil for ages. On each side The fields swell upward to the hills ; beyond, Above the hills, in the blue distance, rise The mountain columns with which earth props heaven.
Side 142 - tis rough and narrow, And winds with short turns down the precipice. And in its depth there is a mighty rock, Which has, from unimaginable years, Sustained itself with terror and with toil Over a gulf, and with the agony With which it clings seems slowly coming down ; — Even as a wretched soul hour after hour Clings to the mass of life ; yet, clinging, leans ; And, leaning, makes more dark the dread abyss In which it fears to fall.
Side 134 - And down into the secrets of the glens, And streams, that with their bordering thickets strive To hide their windings. Thou shalt gaze, at once, Here on white villages, and tilth, and herds, And swarming roads, and there on solitudes That only hear the torrent, and the wind, And eagle's shriek.
Side 142 - Clings to the mass of life; yet clinging, leans; And leaning, makes more dark the dread abyss In which it fears to fall : beneath this crag, Huge as despair, as if in weariness, The melancholy mountain yawns; below, You hear but see not an impetuous torrent Raging among the caverns, and a bridge Crosses the chasm: and high above there grow, With intersecting trunks, from crag to crag, Cedars, and yews, and pines ; whose tangled hah Is matted in one solid roof of shade By the dark ivy's twine. At...
Side 86 - In the afternoon they came unto a land, In which it seemed always afternoon. All round the coast the languid air did swoon, Breathing like one that hath a weary dream. Full-faced above the valley stood the moon; And like a downward smoke, the slender stream Along the cliff to fall and pause and fall did seem. A land of streams ! some, like a downward smoke, Slow-dropping veils of thinnest lawn, did go ; And some thro' wavering lights and shadows broke, Rolling a slumbrous sheet of foam below.
Side 32 - From the village of Jefferson, through which this Cherry Mountain road runs, not only is every one of the great White Mountain group visible, but also the Franconia Mountains, the side of the Willey Mountain, in the Notch, the line of the nearer Green Mountains beyond the Connecticut — in fact, a panorama of hills to the northwest and north, almost as fine as the prospect in that direction from the summit of Mt. Washington.
Side 151 - I have been something of a traveler in our own country — though far less than I could wish — and in Europe have seen all that is most attractive, from the highlands of Scotland to the golden horn of Constantinople ; from the summit of the Hartz Mountains to the fountain of Vaucluse ; but my eye has yet to rest on a lovelier scene than that which smiles around you as you sail from Weir's Landing to Centre Harbor.
Side 107 - In the west, through the blue haze, are seen in the distance the ranges of the Green Mountains ; the remarkable outlines of the summits of Camel's Hump and Mansfield Mountain being easily distinguished when the atmosphere is clear. To the north-west, under your feet, are the clearings and settlement of Jefferson, and the waters of Cherry Pond ; and, further distant, the village of Lancaster, with the waters of Israel's river.
Side 108 - Alpine ponds sleeping under its rocky and. pointed summits ; the flat surface of Franklin, and the rounded top of Pleasant, with their ridges and spurs. Beyond these, the Willey Mountain, with its high, ridged summit ; and, beyond that, several parallel ranges of high, wooded mountains.

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