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IRISH FOX-HUNTERS, GOING TO THE BALL, BY LOW-COMMOTION.

PAGE 253.

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LONDON:
PARTRIDGE AND CO., PATERNOSTER ROW;
DUBLIN: W. CURRY & co.; LEDGER, LIMERICK ; AND ALL BOOKSELLERS.

ALSO AT THE IRISH RAILWAY STATIONS.
Subscribers supplied from 3, Newman's Row, Lincoln's Inn, London, directly by the Agent

of the Author and Editor.

1861.
(THE COPYRIGHT IS RESERVED.)

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THE FIRST SERIES OF IERNE, OR IRELAND,

CONTAINS

NOTICES, INCIDENTS, AND ANECDOTES,

OF OR CONNECTED WITH

1 Roscrea, Dromoland, Cashel, and Clonmel.

2 Mulligan of Mealiffe, Munster Festival, Marriage in the Mountains.

3 The Fair, the Faction Fight, Phoilaphesoom,-Celtic March.

4 General Mathews' "walk over,"'--Russian Mountains, Rural Ball.

5 Limerick Bell(e)s, Recollections of the Road and Denny Ring.

6 Original Anecdotes of the Right Honourable J. P. Curran.

7 Militia, Yeomanry, and Volunteers.

8 Steam down, Storm up, Rambles in Wales, a Sabbath Reflection.

9 Treasures and Dangers of the Deep,--Nelson Light and Landmark.

10 Sketches in and out of College, Fire Brigade, Rev. Charles Wolfe.

11 The Breakfast Ball, Jacky Barrett, the Belle Stratagem, Crinoline.

12 Making much of Tommy Moore, Dublin Fancy-ball, Kilkenny Theatricals.

13 The Naval Service, Charley Bunting piping all hands, &c.

14 Bunting at the Ball, “ The Groves of Blarney," the Inn and the Field.

15 "To the West,”Westport, Westport housė, &c., and the Killeries.

16 The Pilgrimage, Partree, Pillow Lace, Transatlantic Packet Pier.

17 Hunting of Old, and an Old Song, Spring-meet in Carlow, Song on

• The Opening of the Railway.

18 The Middle Country, low-commotion !--The Hunt Balla Poem on

The Kilkenny Hunt Meet.

19 Paddy and the Prussians, or Frederick William outwitted.

20 Bristol, Bath, and Brinsley Sheridan, JENNER, HAVELOCK, London

Prisons, Parks, and Pretty Places.

THE APPENDIX CONTAINS NOTES OF

The Inchiquin Country, the Valley of the Suir, the Cashel Crozier, the
Coulin-Daniel O'Connel.---Limerick “Charley's,” Crack Coachmen, Poula-
fooca, Rusborough.-Fearful Wrecking, Fisheries Neglected, Fair way Lights.
--Fire Statistics-Political facetiæ, Crinoline, Counsellor Plunkett, Carrick-
a-pane, and Carricknagaddy, Sir Dudley St. Leger Hill, C.B. -Foynes
Harbour, the Shannon, Galway and Valentia.-Due consideration for Public
Works, Great Lawyers of the last Age, Lord Clare, &c., and the Alder-
men of Skinner Alley, The Embankment of the

Thames. With Fourteen
Illustrations engraved on Wood and Steel, viz.,:Vignette, Cashel Cathedral,
Celtic March, Falls of Castleconnel and Poulafooca--Kingstown Harbour,
Jacky Barrett

, the Killery and Galway Harbours,-Borne to the Ball by
low-commotion, Dick Lang, the Pace, Foyne's Harbour and Road-side Inn.
Forming one handsome pocket volume, elegantly bound in cloth, gilt
and lettered, price 5s. 8d., post free 6s., and may be had from the Author,
3, Newman's Row, Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, W.C., where Subscribers
will please apply.

8

ADVERTISEMENT.

THE FIRST SERIES OF IERNE

Extends over a period of about eighteen years, viz., from 1813 to 1830, part of both inclusive.

On those parts published, and now forming one handsome pocket volume, besides many other favourable remarks, the Press have observed that the contents are

“Of interest to the general reader, well written, and beautifully printed."-City Press.

“The raciness of Irish fun and humour, historical and biographical anecdotes." --Limerick Chronicle.

“ Most attractive; deserving the support of every Irishman who loves his country."-Kilkenny Moderator.

“Highly graphic and admirably written chapters............a fund of information...............rich humour, peculiarly characteristic of the Irish people.”—Carlow Sentinel.

The Second Series, when selected from the volumnious journal notes, will comprehend a period of fully twenty-five years, viz:-from 1830 to the end of 1855.

The title IERNE has been chosen as the most ancient, poetical, and historical name of Ireland.

The Phænicians, who came from that city, “that wast inhabited of seafaring men, the renowned city which was strong in the sea," whose ship boards were of fir trees of Senir, and who took from the cedars of Lebanon for masts. (Ezekiel 26th and 27th chaps.)

“Boldly did these magnificent mariners steer their fairy vessels, passing by the isles of Hieres, and the coast of

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