Gleason's Monthly Companion, Bind 2

Forsideomslag
F. Gleason, 1873
 

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Side 143 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Side 36 - Or a mother's prayer to Heaven; Or only a beggar's grateful thanks For a cup of water given. Better to weave in the web of life A bright and golden filling. And to do God's will with a ready heart And hands that are swift and willing.
Side 36 - Better to hope, though the clouds hang low, And to keep the eyes still lifted; For the sweet blue sky will soon peep through, When the ominous clouds are rifted! There was never a night without a day, Or an evening without a morning, And the darkest hour, as the proverb goes, Is the hour before the dawning.
Side 36 - Better to weave in the web of life A bright and golden filling. And to do God's will with a ready heart And hands that are swift and willing. Than to snap the delicate, slender threads Of our curious lives asunder. And then blame Heaven for the tangled ends. And sit and grieve and wonder.
Side 345 - Who sees with equal eye, as God of all, A hero perish, or a sparrow fall, Atoms or systems into ruin hurled, And now a bubble burst, and now a world.
Side 324 - For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, those having not the law are a law unto themselves...
Side 479 - The brave man is not he who feels no fear, . For that were stupid and irrational, But he, whose noble soul its fear subdues, And bravely dares the danger nature shrinks from.
Side 334 - Two persons who have chosen each other out of all the species, with design to be each other's mutual comfort and entertainment, have in that action bound themselves to be good-humoured, affable, discreet, forgiving, patient, and joyful, with respect to each other's frailties and perfections, to the end of their lives.
Side 8 - I give you that orange," which one would think would be what is called in legal phraseology, •" an absolute conveyance of all right and title therein," the phrase would run thus : "I give you all and singular my estate and interest, right, title, and claim, and advantage of and in that orange, with all its rind, skin, juice, pulp and pips, and all right and...
Side 443 - A MIGHTY pain to love it is, And 'tis a pain that pain to miss ; But, of all pains, the greatest pain It is to love, but love in vain.

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