The Listener, Bind 1

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G.W. Donohue, 1837

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Side 34 - Content though mean, and cheerful if not gay, Shuffling her threads about the livelong day, Just earns a scanty pittance, and at night, Lies down secure, her heart and pocket light ; She, for her humble sphere by nature fit, (Has little understanding, and no wit, Receives no praise ; but, though her lot be such, Toilsome and indigent) she renders much ; Just knows, and knows no more, her Bible true A. truth the brilliant Frenchman never knew ; And in that charter reads with sparkling eyes Her title...
Side 204 - OH ! weep for those that wept by Babel's stream, Whose shrines are desolate, whose land a dream : Weep for the harp of Judah's broken shell ; Mourn — where their God hath dwelt the godless dwell ! And where shall Israel lave her bleeding feet ? And when shall Zion's songs again seem sweet?
Side 89 - tis slander; Whose edge is sharper than the sword ; whose tongue Outvenoms all the worms of Nile; whose breath Rides on the posting winds, and doth belie All corners of the world : kings, queens, and states, Maids, matrons, nay, the secrets of the grave This viperous slander enters.
Side 51 - I like this retirement the better, because of an ill report it lies under of being haunted ; for which reason (as I have been told in the family) no living creature ever walks in it besides the chaplain. My good friend the butler desired me, with a very grave face, not to venture myself in it after sunset, for that one of the footmen had been almost...
Side 38 - ... would fail us to repeat the words, brief as they were, in which this aged saint expressed her gratitude to the Saviour who died for her ; her enjoyment of the God who abode with her ; her expectations of the heaven to which she was hasting, and perfect contentedness with her earthly portion. It proved on inquiry to be worse than it appeared. The outline of her history, as gathered at different times from her own lips, was this : — Her husband's name was Peg ; her own...
Side 152 - ... while yet nothing causes a greater expense of feeling. The heart is fretted and exhausted by being subjected to an alternation of contrary excitements, with the ultimate mortifying consciousness of their contributing to no end.
Side 18 - ... purpose was in the task. A third resumed the newspaper he had read for a whole hour before, and betook himself at last to the advertisements. A fourth repaired to the alcove— gathered some flowers, picked them to pieces, threw them away again, and returned. " Cease thy prating, thou never resting timepiece," said I to myself,
Side 19 - I wish," said a little girl at the end of the table, " that I might work some trimmings for my frock, but I am obliged to do this plain work first. The poor lame girl in the village, who is almost starving, would do it for me for a shilling, but I must save my allowance this week to buy a French trinket I have taken a fancy to.
Side 37 - And then she laid her head upon a cold, black stone, projecting from the wall beside the fire-place, as if unable to support it longer. We remarked that it was bad weather. " Yes," she answered — then hastily correcting herself — " No, not bad — it is God Almighty's weather, and cannot be bad.
Side 35 - Is it so, then, that there is no happiness on earth ? Or if it does exist, is it a thing of circumstance, confined to certain states, dependent on rank and station ; here to-day and gone to-morrow, in miserable dependence on the casualties of life ? We are often asked the question by those by whom the world is yet untried, who, even in the spring-time of their mirth, are used to hear the complaints of all around them, and well may wonder what they mean. We affect not to answer questions which never...

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