Schiller's Maria Stuart

Forsideomslag
Ginn, 1908 - 361 sider
 

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Side 247 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried, What hell it is in suing long to bide ; To lose good days that might be better spent ; To waste long nights in pensive discontent; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow ; To feed on hope ; to pine with fear and sorrow ; To have thy Prince's grace, yet want her peers...
Side 277 - It is the curse of kings to be attended By slaves that take their humors for a + warrant To break within the bloody house of life, And on the winking of authority, To understand a law, to know the meaning Of dangerous majesty, when, perchance, it frowns More upon humor than advised +respect.
Side 247 - Full little knowest thou, that hast not tride, What hell it is in suing long to bide : To loose good dayes, that might be better spent ; To wast long nights in pensive discontent ; To speed to-day, to be put back to-morrow ; To feed on hope, to pine with feare and sorrow...
Side 217 - ... of her sex. In order to form a just idea of her character, we must set aside one part of her conduct, while she abandoned herself to the guidance of a profligate man ; and must consider these faults, whether we admit them to be imprudences or crimes, as the result of an...
Side 268 - Sheriff and his officers entered her chamber, and found her still kneeling at the altar. She immediately started up, and with a majestic mien, and a countenance undismayed and even cheerful, advanced towards the place of execution, leaning on two of Paulet's attendants. She was dressed in a mourning habit, but with an elegance and splendour which she had long laid aside, except on a few festival days. An Agnus Dei hung by a pomander chain at her neck, her beads at her girdle, and in her hand she...
Side 278 - Reputation, reputation, reputation ! O ! I have lost my reputation. I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial.
Side 234 - Her chief anxiety was how to secure the advantages which would arise from Mary's death, without appearing to have given her consent to a deed so odious. She often hinted to Paulet and Drury, as well as to some other courtiers, that now was the time to discover the sincerity of their concern for her safety, and that she expected their zeal would extricate her out of her present perplexity. Bui they were wise enough to seem not to understand her meaning.
Side 217 - ... human mind — of the frailty of our nature, of the violence of passion, and of the influence which situations, and sometimes momentary incidents, have on persons whose principles are not thoroughly confirmed by experience and reflection. Enraged by the ungrateful conduct of her husband ; seduced by the treacherous counsels of one in whom she reposed confidence ; transported by the violence of her own temper, which never lay sufficiently under the guidance of discretion, she was betrayed into...
Side 253 - But fix'd her eyes unmov'd upon the ground, And, what he says and swears, regards no more, Than the deaf rocks, when the loud billows roar; But...

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