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Forsideomslag
Oxford University Press, 1897

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Side 391 - And thou shalt take no gift: for the gift blindeth the wise, and perverteth the words of the righteous. 9 Also thou shalt not oppress a stranger: for ye know the heart of a stranger, seeing ye were strangers in the land of Egypt.
Side 128 - WHEREAS the Provinces of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick have expressed their Desire to be federally united into One Dominion under the Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with a Constitution similar in Principle to that of the United Kingdom : And whereas such a Union would conduce to the Welfare of the Provinces and promote the Interests of the British Empire...
Side 15 - If meat or drink thou ne'er gav'st nane, — Every nighte and alle, The fire will burn thee to the bare bane; And Christe receive thy saule.
Side 57 - Here lies HENRY PURCELL, Esq., who left this life, and is gone to that blessed place where only his harmony can be exceeded.
Side 78 - For the purpose at which they aim they are admirably done, and there are few visitants to any of our noble shrines who will not enjoy their visit the better for being furnished with one of these delightful books, which can be slipped into the pocket and carried with ease, and is yet distinct and legible. ... A volume such as that on Canterbury is exactly what we want, and on our next visit we hope to have it with us. It is thoroughly helpful, and the views of the fair city and its noble cathedral...
Side 283 - ... third the fruited vines a-row, While still, unheard, but in its wonted way, Piped the drear wind of that December day. So with this Earthly Paradise it is, If ye will read aright, and pardon me, Who strive to build a shadowy isle of bliss Midmost the beating of the steely sea, Where tossed about all hearts of men must be; Whose ravening monsters mighty men shall slay, Not the poor singer of an empty day.
Side 194 - The sodger frae the wars returns, The sailor frae the main; But I hae parted frae my love, Never to meet again, My dear — Never to meet again. When day is gane, and night is come, And a...
Side 216 - Light that makes things seen, makes some things invisible, were it not for darkness and the shadow of the earth, the noblest part of the creation had remained unseen, and the stars in heaven as invisible as on the fourth day, when they were created above the horizon with the sun, or there was not an eye to behold them.
Side 406 - Pawne [the upper part of the building wherein were the hundred shops or stalls] , which was richly furnished with all sorts of the finest wares in the city, she caused the same Burse, by an herald and trumpet, to be proclaimed the Royal Exchange, and so to be called from thenceforth, and not otherwise.
Side 50 - He also quoted some evidence in support of the view that the disease occurred at the end of the seventeenth and beginning of the eighteenth century in Germany and more definite evidence that it occurred in Upper Italy and Hungary in 1890.

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