The Works of Michael de Montaigne: Comprising His Essays, Letters, Journey Through Germany and Italy. With Notes from All the Commentators, Biographical and Bibliographical Notices, &c. &c

Forsideomslag
C. Templemon, 1845 - 660 sider
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Almindelige termer og sætninger

Populære passager

Side 298 - I have no more made my book than my book has made me— a book consubstantial with its author, concerned with my own self, an integral part of my life; not concerned with some third-hand, extraneous purpose, like all other books.
Side 218 - Where is the wise? where is the scribe? where is the disputer of this world? has not God made foolish the wisdom of this world? For after that in the wisdom of God the world by wisdom knew not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preaching to save them that believe.
Side 50 - Let the master not only examine him about the bare words of his lesson, but also as to the sense and meaning of them, and let him judge of the profit he has made, not by the testimony of his memory, but by that of his understanding. Let him make him put what he hath learned into a hundred several forms, and accommodate it to so many several subjects, to see if he yet rightly comprehend it, and has made it his own ; taking instruction by his progress from the institutions of Plato.
Side 175 - I do not bite my nails about the difficulties I meet with in my reading; after a charge or two, I give them over. Should I insist upon them, I should both lose myself and time; for I have an impatient understanding, that must be satisfied at first: what I do not discern at once, is by persistence rendered more obscure.
Side 227 - Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither hath entered into the heart of man the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.
Side 177 - But boldly to confess the truth (for since one has passed the barriers of impudence, off with the bridle), his way of writing, and that of all other long-winded authors, appears to me very tedious: for his prefaces, definitions, divisions, and etymologies take up the greatest part of his work: whatever there is of life and marrow is smothered and lost in the long preparation.
Side 77 - ... all things. They are savages at the same rate that we say fruits are wild, which nature produces of herself and by her own ordinary progress ; whereas in truth, we ought rather to call those wild, whose natures we have changed by our artifice, and diverted from the common order.
Side 49 - But, in truth, all I understand as to that particular is only this, that the greatest and most important difficulty of human science is the education of children.
Side 207 - And whereas all the other things, whether beast or vessel, that enter into the dreadful gulf of this monster's (whale's) mouth, are immediately lost and swallowed up, the sea-gudgeon retires into it in great security, and there sleeps.
Side lxxxvi - O'er my dim eyes a darkness hung ; My ears with hollow murmurs rung. In dewy damps my limbs were chill'd ; My blood with gentle horrors thrill'd ; My feeble pulse forgot to play ; I fainted, sunk, and died away.

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