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LINCOLN'S INN HALL.

also be remarked, has been made into

a garden. The approach to the new hall, The new buildings of Lincoln's Inn form through the garden and along the terrace, a pile of considerable mass and extent, affords therefore a variety of scenic points and one that appears to great advantage. of view. Not only is it so insulated that it can be The vestibule forms a hall or gallery viewed in every direction, but it has on of communication, about seventy or its north and east sides the garden and eighty feet in extent from north to south. lawn of the Inn, and on its west the It is divided in its plan into three comspacious and planted inclosure of Lin- partments, the centre one of which is coln's Inn-fields. These accessories of carried up much loftier than the other landscape both harmonize and contrast two, so as to form an octagonal lantern, admirably with the building, and sup- having on each of its sides a window, ply to it a foreground and background, enriched with stained glass. whether it be viewed from the east or The drawing-room and council-room from the west. New Square, it may correspond as to size, being thirty-one

JANUARY, 1846.

B

feet by twenty-four, exclusive of the spa- | their amusements. That they may kill cious bay on the west side of the one and time and drown care, they plunge into tlịe east side of the other. Their archi- follies, vanities, and frivolities, without tecture is very simple, but pleasing. The number. How many of them would ceilings are wainscotted with what ap- furnish pleasure to the thoughtful man, pears to be some superior kind of wood, or ought to take up the hours of an imof a very rich and deep hue, but it is mortal man? Ask of their literature. merely common deal, to which staining See month by month what men write, and polishing are made to give great and many more read. Its unsubstantial, beauty of colour and surface.

unprofitable frothiness is witness to the The library is a very beautiful apart- same truth, that the many have but a ment, placed not in continuation of the light estimate of the meaning and the general line of the plan from north to worth of life. south, but transversely to it, imparting Yet in spite of this, the German considerable variety to the arrangement speaks truthfully when he says, “ Life is of the interior. Its dimensions are eighty earnest.” It is a solemn thing to be feet by forty, exclusive of the two spa- alive in a world like this, with a nature, cious oriels at its east and west ends, a power, a destiny such as ours. Even which extend to about twenty feet more the triflers among us cannot always shut than the entire length. In the lower out the thought; it comes upon them part of the room the book-cases are sometimes, though against their will, as brought out at right angles to the walls, if it moved down upon the frail netso as to form a series of cabinets or re- work of their frivolities, which they have cesses on each side, leaving a clear space spread round them for a defence, and broke down the centre of the room of eighteen through the barrier, that it might come in feet—a gallery indeed of noble propor- and speak solemnly to their soul. Like the tions.

king in Babylon, they may call for the The hall at Lincoln's Inn bears a con- wine-cup, and think to be light-hearted siderable resemblance in its general ar- amidst the excesses of wild revelry; but rangement to that of the Middle Temple, like him, too, they must sometimes wake hitherto by far the finest among those of up to earnestness and fear when mystic the inns of court, but it is now eclipsed warnings tell of life's bigher purposes by the one her majesty has recently all unfulfilled, and of the irrecoveropened.

able ruin that must await those whose character, when thus weighed, “ shall be found wanting.”

Fraught with such a power are those THE NEW YEAR.

seasons when we are called to share or “ Life is earnest.” So says the great disease is wasting around us, or death

to witness some awful providence; when poet of Germany. And such is the utterance of the thoughtful few. There the realities of another world seem to

into

up our chambers; when are very many who say, or whose lives say it for them—that they rather hold with vision. And such, too, in its tendency

come out largely and solemnly upon our the poet of England, when he calls life

and power, is this season in the changings A tale told by an idiot,

of time, the early hours of another Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing." year. Who can pass the boundary-line

from one year to another, without feeling The deep mystery of its meaning they serious and earnest as he does so ? To neither know, nor care to seek. To fill stand on the grave-brink of a buried up its hours with as little pain and as year, and ask it of the record it has much mirth as possible, and so to let it made, and will bring out against us bypass, seems their chief ambition and care. and-by, is hardly a thing that can be The many think in this way. Ask of their lightly or carelessly done. To-day, on employments. Money, as the procurer of this first day of January, 1846, let us the comforts and the ease they aim at, is stand still a moment before we venture to their chief good, and they do not think any go out into life again, and question the toil too hard in getting it. Night and departed hours, that we may learn better day their brows are furrowed and their how to employ the time that may yet be thoughts busy, that they may add more in store for us. to that which they have already. Ask of We have lived quite through a whole

comes

our un

year. When we began to live its first what has been wrong in that past. Live hour, we were not sure of finishing it; to-morrow as now you are wishing that and when we began the next, it was you had lived yesterday. Do not make doubtful whether the whole of it would fresh work for regrets if you live till be ours; and so with every hour that came the first day in January, 1847, like these after. Yet we have lived hour after regrets that you feel to-day. Be it your hour, and day after day, and so bave care that what you sorrow for in 1845, be lived out the whole year. That portion quite left out of 1846. of life is gone, and will never return. “ But how may you be sure of doing There is no power in the universe that this ? How may you hope that this new can alter one single hour of the whole : year shall be better spent than that just as we lived it—there it is, stereo- which is gone ?” Do you really wish to typed for ever. How do we like that know? Are you quite in earnest in thought? Are we glad—satisfied even wishing so to alter? Then humbly now, --that so it should be? Are we not at in prayer, let us ask God by his Spirit to this moment thinking of some things that teach us what is right, and by his grace we would rather have forgotten? We to help us to do it. should wish them blotted out altogether ; But, first of all, can nothing be done they should not stand just as they do, if with all this guilty and imperfect past ? we could have them now to alter and to We cannot alter'it, we know; but can change. We are remembering some hours nothing be done to take away

all when we quite forgot God. He was not quietness as we think of it? Must we then in all our thoughts, we were giving think of it as always waiting there until ourselves up to what we call pleasure, and at the judgment it will condemn us? Oh, enjoyed ourselves without God; we would no! Though we cannot alter it, God not have it stand so if we could help it. can forgive it. If, truly sorrowing for all We would rather that life should have the evil, we ask earnestly the mercy of been enjoyed in the very thought of God our heavenly Father, through his dear as our loving Father, providing for us Son, our Saviour, all this long account, pleasure all undeserved. We remember though he must remember it, yet he will those little things at one time, and those not remember it against us any more for others at another, which we did, and The sin he will pardon, and the which must have grieved our Father, for punishment he will prevent. Be it ours, they were sinful; the number of them then, to hallow this new year's day by prove so large while we try to think of the humble, penitential prayer, that God will year, that we cannot reckon them all; we for Christ's dear sake forgive to us all would rather that God should not reckon the guiltiness of the past. them all so minutely; we would much And then for the future. Has not the rather that they were not there to be great secret of our so frequent wrongreckoned. We think how very little doing been, that we have been trying to good done there is down in the record, go right of ourselves, and have forgotten and yet how many opportunities there our own weakness, and the Giver of all were for doing it; those hours that we strength? Let us stop then a while, and idled away—that we wasted in trifles— think before we venture out into life how we might have used them better for again. We are all travellers bound on our own improvement, and for the good a solemn journey. In the path we have of very many about us. We do not like yet to tread none of us has ever trodden that so dark an account should be kept a single step before. It is all new, all against us; we would have that altered untried. We may go wrong. And if if we could. But you know you cannot we do, we shall suffer harm that can alter it; and so you say it is useless to never be altered or undone. We may, recall it thus. Nay, dear friend, not so. perhaps, afterwards return to the right; True, you cannot alter that which you but the time destroyed, and the wrong recall; yet it is useful to recall it. Use- suffered, will be facts for ever, that no ful thus,- you cannot live the past hour after facts can change or take away. differently, but you may the next hour. The time destroyed !-for we have so Alter this which you are living now just little here, and that little is so swiftly as you would like to alter that which you passing, that we cannot afford to waste lived yesterday. Let all in the past that any in faint-hearted endeavours after you would have different, teach you to right, much less in diligently following make all in the future different from wrong. The right path—the better path

ever.

—this we want to find,—to know it with , if I can; do you good if you will let me; certain mind, and then to follow it with and warn you whether you will let me or eager step and ready heart. Who shall not. Time flies; life is short; unexbe our guide ? There are many voices pected things happen ; we are here toanswering to our call; but under whose day, we may be gone to-morrow; an leading shall we know that we are right? hour lost, is lost for ever. These are old “There is a way that seemeth good unto a sayings, very old; but none the worse man, but the end thereof are the ways of on that account. Hear them; consider death.” The path of life—where is it? them; profit by them; get from them We will thank God for clear utterance | lasting good. and a certain sound: We have a coun “Much in little" is my motto-small sellor, a guide, a friend. “I am the sentences and large signification. Truth is way,” his voice is saying. Bright shines a straight line, and error is a zig-zag ; his pattern through all the path; he has let us have no zig-zags, but all straight left it for us as an example that we should lines. Let us not go round the field, but follow in his steps. This, then, be our across it. A hundred things have I to course throughout the new year. Meekly, say, but very little shall I say upon each. and with fervent prayer for the Holy A word to the wise is enough, and more Spirit's teaching, will we study the life than enough to the foolish. and the words of our blessed Saviour; Though none can do what they would, and distrusting our own often-tried feeble- all may do what they can.

What can ness, we will ask God's help that the you do, then ? What can I do? What moments, be they many or be they few, can we all do for man's good and God's that shall yet be given to us in this new glory? God has not made us and breathed year, may bear with them to eternity a the spirit of life into us, for nothing. He better record for us than the past have gave wings to the bird that he might fly; done. And then, what matters it whether fins to the fish that he might swim ; we close the year on earth or in heaven, claws to the mole that he inight delve ; so that we be at every hour found watch and to man he has given affections that ing. Death never will come to us an he might live in love; and a living soul, untimely messenger :

and reasoning faculties, that he might

know God, and magnify his holy name So, if our days must fly,

for ever.
We'll keep their end in sight;
We'll spend them all in wisdom's way,

“ On! On !" "Forward! Forward !” And let them speed their flight.

are the watch words of our day. There is

no sitting down by the way-side, no They 'll waft us sooner o'er This life's tempestuous sea :

resting at the mile-stone--indeed, mileSoon we shall reach the peaceful shore stones are hardly wanted; we may now Of blest eternity.”

travel far without seeing any. J. A. B.

Once we travelled by pack-horses; all very well then—will not do now.

Sad slow mode of getting on, and so was the wagon-not much faster. No wonder

they set up coaches and mails. PackWHAT ARE YOU DOING WITH YOUR TIME? horses and wagons walked, coaches and

mails run, but mankind wanted to fly, Habits change, manners change, cus- and fly they do now along the railroad. toms change,-great changes since I was a boy,-cannot do now as we did then. Your journey may be long, but pay your fare Oh no! We then were slow, we must

A hiss! a shriek! a rumble!-you are there. now be quick; we then were asleep, we If you were five minutes too late for now must be awake.

the pack-horse and the wagon, you might Are you using time, or abusing time? overtake them; if five minutes past the making it a friend or an enemy? pluck- proper time by the coach and mail, it ing roses, or gathering thorns for eter

was possible they might not have started; Odd questions-very odd, but but if five minutes too late by the railworth hearing, worth regarding, and road, there is no hope for you. The worth answering. Are you using or steam is up, the bell rings to the minute, abusing time?

the shrill whistle is heard, and in five My style is brief, my manner abrupt, minutes the train is nearly five miles off. but my object is good. I will win you Be in time! Be in time !

ALAN QUINTIN'S INQUIRIES.

No. I.

nity ?

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