The land of Lorne, including the cruise of the 'Tern' to the Outer Hebrides, Bind 2

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Populære passager

Side 225 - A' made a finer end, and went away an it had been any christom child ; a' parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets and play with flowers and smile upon his fingers...
Side 135 - Changed his hand and checked his pride. He chose a mournful Muse Soft pity to infuse ; He sung Darius great and good, By too severe a fate Fallen, fallen, fallen, fallen, Fallen from his high estate. And weltering in his blood; Deserted at his utmost need By those his former bounty fed; On the bare earth exposed he lies With not a friend to close his eyes.
Side 220 - I have seen the walls of Balclutha, but they were desolate. The fire had resounded in the halls : and the voice of the people is heard no more. The stream of Clutha was removed from its place by the fall of the walls. The thistle shook there its lonely head ; the moss whistled to the wind. The fox looked out from the windows, the rank grass of the wall waved round its head. Desolate is the dwelling of Moina, silence is in the house of her fathers.
Side 108 - But one of mighty size, and strange; That, rough or smooth, is full of change, And stirring in its bed. For to this Lake, by night and day, The great Sea-water finds its way Through long, long windings of the hills; And drinks up all the pretty rills And rivers large and strong...
Side 35 - And are at their wit's end. Then they cry unto the Lord in their trouble, And he bringeth them out of their distresses. He maketh the storm a calm, So that the waves thereof are still. Then are they glad because they be quiet ; So he bringeth them unto their desired haven.
Side 34 - They that go down to the sea in ships, that do business in great waters ; These see the works of the Lord, and his wonders in the deep.
Side 11 - But here, — above, around, below, On mountain or in glen, Nor tree, nor shrub, nor plant, nor flower, Nor aught of vegetative power, The weary eye may ken. For all is rocks at random thrown, Black waves, bare crags, and banks of stone...
Side 34 - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: their soul is melted because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wits
Side 10 - Hath rent a strange and shatter'd way Through the rude bosom of the hill, And that each naked precipice, Sable ravine, and dark abyss, Tells of the outrage still. The wildest glen, but this, can show Some touch of Nature's genial glow ; On high Benmore green mosses grow, And heath-bells bud in deep...
Side 226 - Weep on the rocks of roaring winds, O maid of Inistore! Bend thy fair head over the waves, thou lovelier than the ghost of the hills; when it moves, in a sunbeam, at noon, over the silence of Morven!

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