Billeder på siden
PDF
ePub

more against the office of a bishop; and when it was doubtful, whether any person in that character would be tolerated in the community; I now contemplate nine of our number, conducting the duties of their office without interruption; and in regard not to them only, but to ten of us who have gone to their rest, I trust the appeal may be made to the world, for their not being chargeable with causes of offence to our fellow Christians and our fellow citizens generally, or with the assuming of any powers within our communion, not confessedly recognised by our Ecclesiastical institutions.

Being your senior by many years, I enjoy satisfaction in the expectation of the good which you may be expected to be achieving, in what is now our common sphere of action, when I shall be removed from it: and, with my prayers for the success of your endeavours to this effect, I subscribe myself your affectionate brother,

THE AUTHOR.

[graphic]

vi

the office of a bishop; and when it was ether any person in that character rated in the community; I now conof our number, conducting the duties

without interruption; and in regard mly, but to ten of us who have gone to trust the appeal may be made to the ir not being chargeable with causes of r fellow Christians and our fellow citily, or with the assuming of any powers communion, not confessedly recognised siastical institutions. ur senior by many years, I enjoy satis

le expectation of the good which you cted to be achieving, in what is now our ere of action, when I shall be removed with my prayers for the success of your o this effect, I subscribe myself your af ther,

THE AUTHOR

ficiently general concern for insertion in the Cyclopedia; it was afterwards reviewed under the impression that the time might come, when the former labour would not be unacceptable, within the communion for which it had been designed. In the present publication, the narrative has been continued to the present time. With it, there are given the matters kept back from the publication in the Cyclopedia; and a continuation of similar statements and remarks.

It has been occasionally suggested, from a knowledge of the materials in the hands of the author, and in consideration of the opportunities which he has possessed of personal observation of characters and of facts, that it would be better to embody the narrative with the remarks, and to make a history of the whole. The mere melting of them into one mass, after the separation of them as related above, did not seem likely to be fruitful of any considerable advantage: and as to the name of “a history," it would not only be disproportioned to the work, but perhaps pledge to an attempt, beyond what there are materials to accomplish. Of materials concerning the aggregate church, the author possesses all that are necessary, and more than will be here given; the view being confined to the more

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

al concern for insertion in the Cycloafterwards reviewed under the imprescime might come, when the former laot be unacceptable, within the comhich it had been designed. In the preon, the narrative has been continued it time. With it, there are given the back from the publication in the Cya continuation of similar statements

been occasionally suggested, from a

the materials in the hands of the auconsideration of the opportunities which sed of personal observation of characcts, that it would be better to embody with the remarks, and to make a hishole. The mere melting of them into ter the separation of them as related t seem likely to be fruitful of any con

intage: and as to the name of a histo

not only be disproportioned to the rhaps pledge to an attempt, beyond e materials to accomplish. Of mateng the aggregate church, the author hat are necessary, and more than will the view being confined to the more

known, had he foreseen such a result of the freedom of social intercourse.

Another license which has grown out of the adopted plan, is the anticipating of some circumstances which took place in England, during the intercourse with his grace the archbishop of Canterbury; when such anticipation might illustrate any matter previously under review. The motive, was the desire to record the said intercourse in the form in which it now appears, that is, in letters to the committee of the church in Pennsylvania: which, having been written when the matters related were fresh on the mind of the narrator, is the more likely to be a faithful exhibition of them. To have enlarged the letters, would have been incorrect; and yet, in what passed in the intercourse, there was such connexion with some points in an earlier part of the work, as was too material to be disregarded. Although there has not been an enlargement of the letters, nor an alteration of them in any instance, there have been attached to them a few notes, containing matters of less moment.

The motive of the author in the statements, is principally to record facts, which may otherwise be swept into oblivion by the lapse of time. For the mixing of his opinions with the facts, a reason may

[ocr errors]
« ForrigeFortsæt »