Religion and Empire: The Dynamics of Aztec and Inca Expansionism

Forsideomslag
Cambridge University Press, 31. aug. 1984 - 266 sider
Religion and Empire is an innovative and provocative study of the two largest states of the Precolumbian Americas, the Aztec and Inca Empires. By examining the causes of the formation and expansion of these two empires, the authors identify similar patterns and processes underlying their rise and decline. They demonstrate that in both examples among the critical elements in the transition from marginal people to imperial power to disintegrating society were changes in traditional religion, including the elaboration of Aztec human sacrifice and Inca worship of the corpses of their kings. The authors show that the complex interaction between such ideological shifts and political and economic factors generated the spectacular historical trajectories of these Pre-Colombian empires.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Brugeranmeldelse  - TomMcGreevy - LibraryThing

A very good book in my opinion. Too much of archaeological interpretation is stuck in the rut of cultural materialist explanation. This book addresses explanation in archaeology both at a general ... Læs hele anmeldelsen

Indhold

Introduction
1
The Aztec imperial expansion
11
The Inca imperial expansion
84
Precolumbian imperialism theories and evidence
152
Ideology and cultural evolution
191
Bibliography
231
Index
262
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